PresidentialElection

Obama on Personal Finance: First Car Had 'a Big Hole in the Floor'

Mitt Romney's net worth: $200 million. Barack Obama's response to Romney's claim that the president's "out of touch" with the concerns of ordinary Americans: Priceless. "I bought my first car for about $900," said Obama. "It had a big hole in the floor that allowed you to see the road, so I knew my wife wasn't marrying me for my money."

The Only Key Swing Voter in This Election? Mr. Dow Jones

Wading through all of the myriad political issues and hot buttons of an election year can be difficult for both candidates and voters. But what if there's only one thing that determines the outcome of a presidential race? Turns out, it may really be that simple.

Rick Santorum: An Average Guy with Ordinary Taxes

Rick Santorum has rarely shied away from controversy in his political career, but there's no controversy to be found in his taxes. Based on his recently released returns, Santorum appears to have been a conscientious taxpayer, and a fairly normal (if a little wealthy) guy.

The Economy Ahead: What to Expect in 2012

With 2011 fast coming to a close, it's time to think about what's next -- if you dare. We've got the good news, the bad news, the key points to watch and some good advice on getting through 2012 with your finances intact.

Perry's Flat Tax Plan: Big Savings, Bigger Costs

On Tuesday, Texas Governor and GOP presidential hopeful Rick Perry finally entered the tax debate with "Cut, Balance and Grow," a startling new flat tax plan that borrows freely from Herman Cain's 9-9-9 proposal. But would it help American workers, or slash, topple and shrink the U.S. economy?

9-9-9, Take 2: Cain's Revamp Still Stings Middle Class

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain unveiled several major changes to his popular 9-9-9 tax plan on Friday. The former Godfather's Pizza CEO even announced that those below the poverty line would pay no income taxes. But the middle class won't find much relief in Cain's fleshed-out plan.

What Middle Class Voters Should Remember in 2012

The U.S. middle class is caught in a vice with falling wages on one side and rising costs on the other. Robert S. Kaplan, author of the business leadership book "What to Ask the Person in the Mirror" suggests five ways that politicians should be responding -- not specific policies, but mindsets that could lead to better ones.