Occupy Wall Street

Where Do You Rank as a Taxpayer?

Regardless of how much you earn, are you bearing your fair share of the nation's tax burden? Here's a simple wait to find out.

The 9 Most Important Financial Stories of 2012

Sometimes the most important news stories get overshadowed by short-term crises and teakettle tempests. With that in mind, we at DailyFinance decided to take a look back at the nine stories of 2012 that are likely to have the biggest impact on your wallet in the year ahead.

Occupy Returns: How Do We Really Feel About Inequality?

Occupy Wall Street celebrates its first birthday today, but the movement's failure to articulate a program has allowed the traditional political parties to dominate the debate over inequality -- which, research shows, is a question Americans are very open to considering.

Occupy Wall Street Marks Anniversary with NYSE Protest

A few hundred Occupy Wall Street activists gathered in New York's financial district on Monday but police kept them well back from the New York Stock Exchange, which they had threatened to surround as part of a day of protests marking the movement's one-year anniversary.

How Thousands of Wealthy People Pay No Taxes (It's Totally Legal)

Debate all you like about whether the rich pay their fair share in taxes, but this is certain: Some high earners pay no taxes at all. A recent IRS study found that 35,000 U.S. taxpayers earning $200,000 or more paid no income tax in 2009. Curious how they pulled it off? Read on...

Occupy the IRS? TaxKilla Shows You How to Bend the Tax Code

Every April, resistance to taxes becomes a national hobby. The rebellious souls at taxKilla.org take that resistance to the extreme by encouraging the broad use of tax loopholes and iffy methods to reduce what you pay to the IRS. But there's nothing illegal about it.

How Can You Get Mitt's Tax Rate? (Hint: You Can't)

Amid all the chatter about Mitt Romney's high income and low taxes, many have wondered why more Americans don't take advantage of those attractive capital gains rates. The answer is that most people can't -- at least not on a level large enough to make a difference in their finances.

Bill Clinton's Prescription for the U.S. Economy

Former President Bill Clinton offered up some wide-ranging prescriptions for curing the nation's ailing economy in a speech at the National Retail Federation's annual convention Monday, from investing in new sectors for job growth to cutting taxes on business.

Consume with a Conscience: The Rise of Ethical Shopping

More Americans are waking up to the idea of citizen consumerism -- a fitting topic on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, when our thoughts turn to social consciousness. Could the concept of making more of our purchases purposeful go mainstream in the same way that the green buying movement has?

OWS Prepares to Occupy Martin Luther King Jr. Day

It's been a rough few months for the social justice activists of Occupy Wall Street. But on Sunday and Monday, the movement will take to the streets again to honor one of America's most famous protesters: Dr. Martin Luther King.

2011's Biggest Financial Heroes and Villains

In a year saturated with big financial headlines, identifying the fiscal heroes and villains is bound to be an exercise in oversimplification. But DailyFinance is going to try: Herewith, we present our picks for the best and the worst of 2011.

2011 in Business: 7 Stories That Affected You Most

Between debt ceiling debates, the crisis in the eurozone, and battles over tax rates, money issues filled the front pages in 2011. Here are our picks for the seven stories that most directly affected your wallet.

Occupy Our Homes Targets Banks Over Mortgage Mess

A spin-off group from Occupy Wall Street, called Occupy Our Homes, has formed to reverse and stop foreclosures. Lately, the group has been using creative tactics to raise awareness about the banking practices that led to the housing bubble.

Take My Wealth, Please: Why Some 1%-ers Back the 99%

Millions of Americans who once viewed themselves in vague terms now see the world divided into two sharply defined groups: the 99% and the 1%. But the line isn't so clear cut, and many of the wealthy have been reaching across it for quite awhile.

Occupy Protests: Shop Mom-and-Pop on Black Friday

Occupy protesters want shoppers to occupy something besides door-buster sales and crowded mall parking lots on Black Friday. Some don't want people to shop at all. Others just want to divert shoppers from big chains and giant shopping malls to local mom-and-pops. And while the actions don't appear coordinated, they have similar themes: supporting small businesses while criticizing the day's dedication to conspicuous consumption and the shopping frenzy that fuels big corporations.

What 'Percent' Are You? How the Numbers Really Add Up

Blue State vs. Red State is so last decade: Now, the dividing lines in America are percentages: 99%, 1%, 53%, 47% ... the list goes on. And figuring out who to sympathize with -- or even who you are -- can leave a person 100% confused. We break down the numbers.

The Long-Term Relationship You Just Can't Quit

For all the anti-bank anger erupting across the country, relatively few of us are actually parting ways with our significant financial institutions because of it. In the past six weeks a mini bank-run sent 700,000 new customers to credit unions. But that's hardly noticeable on the scale of all U.S. banking customers.

Men's Wearhouse: Suits for the 99%

The Occupy Wall Street protesters might not believe they've got too many "suits" on their side, but retailer Men's Wearhouse took a stand for them last week. On Wednesday, Occupy Oakland planned a citywide strike to protest income disparity in America, and the local Men's Wearhouse closed its doors in support.

Bank Transfer Day: Small Protests, Big Changes

Did Bank Transfer Day work? Over the weekend, many Americans came out to protest big banks, and while there's no hard data yet to gauge the day's impact, credit unions around the country are reporting a continuing upsurge in interest. And the protests don't appear to be fading.