Newspapers

The 10 Fastest Dying Industries in America

The rise of cheap imports, technological advancements and the financial crisis have collectively delivered harsh blows to many U.S. industries. IBISWorld is out with a list of 10 American industries that have been hardest hit.

What to Watch This Week: Malls, Tech, Homes and Papers

With 2012's first earnings season well under way, let's go over some of the items that will help shape the week that lies ahead: Here's why you should be watching one major mall owner, two tech giants, three homebuilders and a couple of old media behemoths.

Newspapers: Going...Going...Gone!

For anybody who has followed the news over the past few years (probably on a computer), the long-awaited demise of newspapers shouldn't come as much of a surprise. But on Wednesday, the bell tolled once again for the printed word when the University of Southern California's Annenberg Center for the Digital Future offered a prophecy: Within five years, only four major daily papers will continue in print form.

Can Google's Android Undercut iTunes for News?

Google is considering a plan to charge publishers less to sell news to Android users than the 30% fee that Apple typically charges to sell apps on iTunes. Will that be enough to attract news publishers?

Online Advertising Overtakes Print Ads For First Time

This year, for the first time, advertisers have spent more online than they have on print newspaper ads. Digital-marketing research firm eMarketer said U.S. spending on online ads will reach $25.8 billion in 2010, compared with $22.8 billion on print ads, The Wall Street Journal said.

Can Group Buying Save the Newspaper Business?

Although many media pundits have declared that newspapers are in a death spiral, group buying may -- just may -- have an antidote. This business is a perfect fit for the existing newspaper sales force, which has a deep Rolodex of local customers.

Yes, Tablet Users Really Are Reading More

Publishers talk about the Apple iPad and Amazon Kindle and other tablet devices as their salvation. Now, new consumer research suggests that view may be grounded in reality: Tablet users are reading more -- and are reconciled to paying.

Apple Subscription Plan Not So Great for Publishers

There's nothing newspaper and magazine publishers crave more right now than a straightforward means of selling subscriptions via Apple's app store. But the news that Apple is on the verge of announcing a plan to let them do just that is likely to be of limited comfort to them.

Philly's Papers Are Going Back on the Block

Philadelphia Media Network thought it had a deal after winning the papers in April, but the Teamsters have balked at the last minute. That means the Philly Inquirer and Daily News will be auctioned again, and PMN plans to try again.

Newspaper Circulation: WSJ Bucks the Downward Trend

Only one of the 25 largest U.S. newspapers increased its circulation in the last six months: The Wall Street Journal. USA Today, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times were all down significantly.

The WSJ vs. the NYT: It's a Newspaper War!

Verbal bullets were flying Monday at a launch event for The Wall Street Journal's New York City metro section. Managing editor Robert Thomson accused The New York Times of alienating readers with biased reporting and risking its reputation by outsourcing its news gathering.

New York Times Execs: We're Ready for Murdoch, OK?

New York Times Co. executives say they're more than prepared to handle the challenge posed by The Wall Street Journal's expansion. "When you're the lead dog, people are constantly going after you," said CEO Janet Robinson on the company's first-quarter earnings call.

WSJ Slashes Prices as Murdoch Aims at NY Times

Rupert Murdoch has a history of contrarian gambles that pay off big. But with newspaper advertising in a historic slump and online ad spend overtaking print for the first time, is the price war a smart move at this time?

New York Times Reporter in Plagiarism Probe

Editors at The New York Times today will determine the fate of Zachery Kouwe, a business reporter who copied passages from competing news outlets in numerous articles, in a case that may illustrate the hazards of practicing web-speed journalism.

USA Today: 'Furloughed' Means Stay Home

Employees at Gannett's flagship newspaper USA Today must be insanely dedicated: Why else would its publisher feel the need to explain to them exactly what it means to be forced to take a week off. But that's just what Dave Hunke decided his already-depressed workforce needed to hear.