New orleans

Midday Market Minute: BP, Gulf Coast Oil Spillers Face Day in Court

Nearly three years after a deepwater well rupture killed 11 men, sank a rig and spewed 4 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, BP and the other companies involved are scheduled to face their judge in court. The trial is set to start Monday in New Orleans before a federal judge, but a settlement is possible.

The Best U.S. Cities for Retirees

When choosing where to retire, there are lots of factors to consider beyond fun in the sun. Good health care, cost of living, low crime rates, and a host of cultural aspects come into play. So where should you set your sights? Kiplinger and the Martin Prosperity Institute pick out some winners.

AG Holder: $4.5 Billion Settlement Not the End of BP Oil Spill Probe

Two men who worked for BP during the 2010 Gulf oil spill disaster have been charged with manslaughter, hours after BP announced it was paying $4.5 billion in a settlement with the U.S. government over the disaster. U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said the criminal investigation is continuing.

Pop Quiz: Do You Know the Cool Facts About Cold, Hard Cash?

Forget flags and fireworks: When it comes to things that really hold America together, few things beat the little scraps of green and black paper that we keep in our pockets. They pay for our necessities and feed our dreams, but how much do you really know about them?

Food Deserts: Where Have All the Inner-City Grocery Stores Gone?

Chicago entrepreneur Karriem Beyah grew up working in the grocery business, but when he courted some industry heavyweights to bring stores to the South Side, their response was disdainful: "Who wants to go over there?" It's not just a Windy City problem.

The 10 Costliest Floods in American History

Last week, the Army Corps of Engineers flooded Vicksburg, Miss., to save New Orleans, an awful choice that speaks volumes about how hard it is for even modern technology to fight Mother Nature. 24/7 Wall St. looks back at other times when water won the battle.

The Economic Impact of the 'Katrina Diaspora'

Five years after Hurricane Katrina, an estimated 100,000 displaced New Orleans residents have yet to return home. What impact have these evacuees had on the local economies of their new homes?

The Awful Odyssey of FEMA's Hurricane Katrina Trailers

After Hurricane Katrina, the Federal Emergency Management Agency bought 145,000 trailers to house displaced victims. Today the trailers -- many of which emitted unsafe levels of formaldehyde -- have become a symbol of incompetence in the face of a national tragedy.

After Katrina, the New Orleans Population Goes Upscale

Five years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans is older, wealthier and less diverse, but it's also home to more well-off young people -- demographic changes that could attract more businesses and developers, and give a real lift to efforts to rebuild the Big Easy.

Five Years After Katrina, New Orleans Tourism Rebounds

Following the devastating effects of Hurricane Katrina five years ago, New Orleans saw the number of visitors to the city evaporate. New Orleans' $5 billion tourism industry slowly recovered, however, and is now once again approaching pre-Katrina visitor levels.

HBO Orders Second Season of Treme

Just two days after the TV premiere of Treme, David Simon's ode to New Orleans, HBO has ordered a second season of the series, the cable network said Tuesday. The speedy renewal was quick, even for Simon, whose previous HBO series, The Wire, was one of the best shows in TV history.

Makeover needed: New Orleans

Who can forget the video of the thousands of refugees living in squalor at the New Orleans Superdome, waiting for rescue while government entities...