New York Times

In Defense of Online Shopping (Delia Ephron, Listen Up)

Screenwriter Delia Ephron did not have a merry online Christmas shopping experience at J. Crew. But rather than complain about the company's customer service, she turned an op-ed column in the New York Times into a wide-ranging indictment of online shopping itself. Here's why she's wrong.

What to Watch This Week: Malls, Tech, Homes and Papers

With 2012's first earnings season well under way, let's go over some of the items that will help shape the week that lies ahead: Here's why you should be watching one major mall owner, two tech giants, three homebuilders and a couple of old media behemoths.

Newspapers: Going...Going...Gone!

For anybody who has followed the news over the past few years (probably on a computer), the long-awaited demise of newspapers shouldn't come as much of a surprise. But on Wednesday, the bell tolled once again for the printed word when the University of Southern California's Annenberg Center for the Digital Future offered a prophecy: Within five years, only four major daily papers will continue in print form.

Why Taxing the Rich Is Good for America

Last week, Warren Buffett wrote an incredible opinion piece in The New York Times asking the government to raise taxes on the wealthiest Americans, himself included. "My friends and I have been coddled long enough by a billionaire-friendly Congress," he argued, and he's not alone in that view.

ATM Plus KGB? New Russian Cash Machines Detect Lies

A new Russian ATM makes customers pay for lying: A voice-measured polygraph installed in Russia's state-run Sberbank's electronic tellers can tell if patrons are talking truth or hogwash in applying for a credit card or loan -- an anti-fraud weapon with roots in the old Soviet Union.

Prom Again, This Time Without Curfews

Prom againWhen AmberDawn McCall got her invitation to the prom in Tri-Cities, Washington, she jumped at the opportunity. "A chance to dress up and go out...

Buzzword of the Week: Tent Pole

In the testosterone-laden enclaves of America's business class, buzzwords tend to be a bit manly. Perhaps the best example is "tent pole," a term that refers to a company's most promising, prominent or profitable product -- except when it refers to its biggest problem.

New York Times in Talks to Sell Red Sox Stake

New York Times Co. (NYT) is in talks to sell its stake in the Boston Red Sox baseball team. "It continues to be for sale," New York Times CEO Janet Robinson said, according to Reuters. "We are continuing to talk to a variety of prospective buyers, large and small."

Seven Classic Bad Calls in Business Journalism

Over and over, magazines and newspapers miss the truth about business by a mile. They're so consistently bad, in fact, that the media has been a leading contrary indicator of stock prices and business trends. Here are seven classic examples.

Hearst CEO: Print Newspapers Will Survive

The rest of the industry may be envisioning an all-digital future, by Frank Bennack Jr., vice chairman and CEO of Hearst Corp. is sanguine about the prospects for dead-tree newspapers. "They'll be around as ink and paper for as long as the eye can see," Bennack said Monday.

How The Wall Street Journal Sounds Like Fox News

If you have any doubt that The Wall Street Journal is fast becoming steeped in the corporate culture of Rupert Murdoch's News Corp., I invite you to read a couple of quotations from today's news.

NYT Earnings Rise: Does a Pay Wall Make Sense?

The New York Times Co. had mostly good news to report in its quarterly earnings on Thursday, but that good news casts doubt on the flagship newspaper's commitment to adopting a pay regime for its website at the start of next year.