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3 Reasons Netflix Is Nixing Qwikster

Realizing that the consumer is usually right, Netflix is abandoning plans to separate its streaming business from its mail-order roots. Here's why Qwikster -- the site that would have served as the new home for customers receiving discs by mail -- was mercifully killed by the former tech darling this morning, sending shares higher.

The Week's Top Technology News

Buyouts, bum guidance, and a broadening decline for a one-time tech titan top the week in review. Go inside the stories that prompted this week's big buys and sells in the nexus between Wall Street and Silicon Valley.

This Week's Tech News: All Eyes on the Giants

Dueling streaming deals, a cheaper iPad facing off against Amazon's bookish rival, a check-in from a chipmaker, and Zynga's CityVille relocating: Here's what to watch in high tech news as the week unfolds.

Why Netflix May Never Be Great Again

It doesn't take long to go from hero to goat on Wall Street. Just ask Netflix. The video rental giant has gone from hitting all-time highs just two months ago to busting through new 52-week lows. To blame? A widely criticized price adjustment and its recent Qwikster launch.

5 Things to Know About Netflix's New Qwikster

The video rental giant revealed on Sunday that it will be dividing its operations into two distinct websites: Netflix.com will focus solely on its popular streaming service, while DVD and Blu-ray plans will be swept over to a new website, Qwikster, that will officially launch in a few weeks. Let's go over what subscribers (and investors) need to know.

What Was Wall St. Thinking (Last Week Ed.)?

The boneheaded move of the week was committed by financial journalists, who collectively decided to blame Netflix's recent price hike for its reduction in subscriber targets -- a bad call indeed. Other head-scratchers included the end of boastful Fidelity Magellan chief Harry Lange's tenure, Cracker Barrel's attempts to evade Biglari Holdings, and Restoration Hardware's IPO.

New at Walmart: Streaming Video Rentals

The retail giant will allow customers to snap up a flick while loading their electronic shopping carts with everything from clothes to tires. The move completes Walmart.com's integration of VUDU, and brings the world's largest public corporation by revenue into direct conflict with Netflix.

What You Need to Know About Netflix's Price Hike

Netflix sent shockwaves through the living room yesterday after revealing that it will separate its mail-served discs and streaming service into two distinct pricing plants. And while the initial reaction by many subscribers has been outrage, there's really no need to panic. Here are some myths and misconceptions creating undue concern about Netflix's new deal.

The Plot Thickens: Netflix Users Angered By Latest Digital Twist

Netflix angered customers this week by removing the option to order DVDs via videostreaming consoles and mobile devices. The news that it was eliminating the "Add to DVD Queue" button in order to focus more on streaming videos has drawn thousands of comments, many critical of the company.

Why Blockbuster Went Bust While Netflix Flourished

It's easy to blame Blockbuster's collapse, which culminated Thursday in a voluntary Chapter 11 filing, on the rise of streaming Internet video and kiosk rental options. But Netflix faced the same threats and it's thriving. So what did Netflix do smarter than its bankrupt rival?

Why Netflix's Epix Deal Will Help It Find a Happy Ending

Netflix's deal with Epix to add movies from Paramount, Lionsgate and MGM to its Watch Instantly service's inventory drew bearish reactions from analysts and investors. But the needed deal will help Netflix gain a winning position in the long run.

Netflix Clinches Deal to Stream Hollywood Movies Sooner

Netflix clinched a deal to stream movies online from three Hollywood studios just three months after they appear on pay television. The deal with pay-TV company Epix will let Netflix stream movies from studios Paramount Pictures, Lionsgate and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer much sooner than it does currently, The New York Times reported. The deal is likely to cost Netflix a total of almost $1 billion in licensing fees.