NASA

Will SXSW Reveal the Next Technology Trend?

SXSW opened up big doors for Twitter, but do all businesses that get accolades at the festival go on to greatness? We look back at past award winners to see how they fared.

The Weirdest Things Your Taxes Pay For

Sen. Tom Coburn has released his Wastebook 2012, a look at over $18 billion in projects that are bizarre and hard to justify. Admittedly, that's just a drop in the federal budget. But ... Thoreau-based video games? Robot squirrels?! Take a peek at our gallery of weird government expenditures.

The Government Reports Aren't an All-Clear for Toyota

The carmaker hoped findings from two federal studies would put to rest speculation about its electronics system as a source for unintended acceleration. But the results may not prove enough to give Toyota a leg up in its ongoing legal battles.

Electronics Didn't Cause Toyota Sudden Acceleration

In an affirmation of Toyota's claims, an exhaustive 10-month federal investigation has found no evidence of an electronic source for sudden unintended acceleration in companpy's vehicles. Indeed, human error was cited as the cause in many cases.

NASA Discovers Microbe that Thrives on Toxic Arsenic

NASA has discovered a bacteria that can use arsenic -- which is toxic to most forms of life -- as a building block of its DNA. Scientists say the discovery may broaden our definition of what constitutes life and may revolutionize how we search for life beyond Earth.

NASA, Rackspace Join Forces in Cloud Computing Deal

Clouds float free, but customers using cloud computing services are often nailed down by proprietary software. Not for long: This week, No. 2 cloud services provider Rackspace Hosting said it will join forces with NASA to make their software open-source in an initiative called OpenStack.

NASA's Main Space Contractor to Lay Off 15% of Workforce

NASA%u2019s main space contractor is laying off 15 percent of its shuttle-related workers, as reductions in the space program bite. United Space Alliance, which handles the day-to-day management of the U.S. space shuttle fleet, will lay off workers in Florida, Alabama and Texas, effective October 1, the company said in a statement. The bulk of the cuts will be concentrated in Florida.

Congress Accuses Toyota of Holding Back Information

Congress continues to press Toyota about what it knew when regarding unintended acceleration problems in its vehicles. Lawmakers are now seeking more information about the brake override feature that the automaker has begun installing on new cars and trucks to prevent the malfunctions.

Should Your Teen Be Allowed to Buy a Real 'Lightsaber'

The Spyder III Arctic Pro is a hand-held laser that looks remarkably like a lightsaber. That wouldn't be a problem, if it weren't almost as much of a menace as the fictional weapon. And with lasers getting rapidly more powerful and less expensive, regulation is falling behind.

Free Market to Take Over Space Travel

President Obama presented an overhauled aerospace plan Thursday that will officially mothball NASA's space shuttle program, and put the future of human space travel squarely in the hands of private sector companies. The administration's new free-market approach of designing and operating spacecraft could mean big business for a handful of U.S. companies in what will decidedly be a lucrative new market.

Obama's Plan to Scrap Moon Mission Blasted

President Obama's plan to scrap the Constellation space program designed to send U.S. astronauts to the moon is being blasted by senators from states with heavy space industries. The policy shift reignites questions about the mission of the U.S. space program and the role of private companies in that effort.

NASA Slashes Price for Used Space Shuttles

NASA plans to sell its fleet of space shuttles this fall, when the 30-year old shuttle program is retired in favor of a newer one. But little buyer interest has forced them to drop the price from $40 million each to 28.8 million.