Julius Genachowski

Freedom from Earsplitting Ads: The CALM Act Goes Into Effect

You may not have heard about the CALM Act before, but when you witness the results as the law goes into effect today, you'll probably want to applaud loudly. At last, TV commercials can no longer be broadcast at a higher volume than the programs they accompany.

After GOP Kills Net Neutrality Bill, Focus Shifts Back to FCC

One day after Congressional Republicans killed compromise legislation that would have protected net neutrality -- the principle that broadband providers shouldn't play favorites with Web content -- pressure has returned to the Federal Communications Commission to act on the issue.

FCC's Super WiFi Plan Has Big Potential

White Spaces The Federal Communications Commission is poised to open up a new chunk of wireless spectrum that could soon be used to blanket small towns with wireless signals. The FCC is expected to vote on Sept. 23 to open up the wireless spectrum between TV channels for public use.

Inside the War Over the Internet's Future

Amid a fierce clash over the Net's next era, tech titans Google and Verizon crafted their own broadband policy plan and shined a light on what might be Washington's most ineffectual regulatory agency -- the FCC. Unknown to many, Google and Verizon worked on that plan since fall of 2008.

Telecom Lobbyists Hold Secret Internet Talks

Lobbyists from some of the largest U.S. technology companies are meeting behind closed doors in Washington with telecom giants to discuss net neutrality, following the failed FCC talks and Google's bilateral deal with Verizon. No surprise, public interest groups weren't invited.

How the FCC Bungled Net Neutrality

While often well-intentioned, the agency has watched its own "open Internet policy" slowly, but systematically, crumble over the last five years. Now under Julius Genachowski, the FCC faces an almost no-win situation regarding net neutrality.

FCC Blasted Again Over Closed-Door Internet Meetings

Public interest groups kept up their assault on the FCC's closed-door broadband policy meetings after the agency decided to bypass standard disclosure rules, effectively shutting out the public. One group took out a full page ad in The Washington Post blasting the meetings.