Japan earthquake

Who's Minding the Twitter? Big Companies' Most Painful Mis-Tweets

Businesses love how Twitter lets them connect in a personal way with customers. But because of tweeting's casual and irreverent style, some companies get lulled into a false sense of intimacy -- right up until a poorly thought out tweet gets them into serious hot water.

GM On Track to Be August's Car Sales Winner

GM is expected to show a sales increase of 15.3% from a year ago when it posts August numbers later this week, according to auto industry research firm Edmunds. That would be an improvement of 30,000 cars and light trucks and would eclipse the unit gains of its smaller rivals.

Toyota Accelerates Toward a Market Share Recovery

Toyota will announce Friday that by September, it expects to have all of its North American plants back to their normal production levels. Then, it can begin attempting to recoup the U.S. market share it lost due to shortages related to the Japan earthquake and tsunami, as well as a slew of recalls.

Now Is the Best Time in Years to Sell Your Used Car

Used vehicle prices are at 16-year highs, making it as good a time as there's been in a while to sell your car. Here are a few things to keep in mind if you're selling, as well as some savvy moves for landing your next vehicle in today's complicated car market.

Why Wall Street Is Betting Against General Motors

Short sellers have significantly increased their bet that GM shares are going to drop: Short interest in the No.1 U.S. car company jumped 26.5% to 41.5 million shares in the two-week period that ended May 15.

Car Prices Jump As Japanese Shortages Grow

Car prices have risen quickly and quietly in the last few weeks. According to auto industry research firm Edmunds, the average amount buyers are paying for cars or light trucks is up $350 since Japan's earthquake and tsunami in March -- and the price of Japanese vehicles is up even more.

Why $4 a Gallon Gas Wouldn't Last Long

Not long ago, everyone knew gas was sure to reach $4 a gallon for regular on a nationwide basis soon. Now, though, that sure thing is looking iffy: Gas prices are wavering, and a number of factors at home and abroad are about to come together to push demand -- and prices -- lower.

Disaster Plans: Prepared for a Worst-Case Scenario?

The deadly tornadoes and flooding that struck the South and Midwest in April, the devastating earthquake in Japan, and concerns about terrorist reprisals after Osama Bin Laden's death should serve as reminders to property owners: You may hope it never comes, but you need to plan for the worst-case scenario.

Is GM's Rebound the Real Deal?

Detroit's revival is nearly complete: Chrysler recently made its first profit in five years, Ford has posted its best results since 1998, and GM is poised to retake the crown as the world's biggest automaker. But to hold onto that position, GM will have to adjust to a rapidly shifting auto market.

Will Apple Earnings Feel Aftershock of Japan's Quake?

Apple is gearing up to report its quarterly results after the markets close Wednesday, and both investors and consumers are wondering if it'll take a hit from Japan's massive earthquake and tsunami, which have already rocked the earnings results of some other tech titans.

Automakers' Next Big Worry: A Sales Slowdown in China

The major players in the auto industry have had it rough in the past few years, first with the massive sales declines caused by the recession, and more recently, with the disaster in Japan. But the next challenge they face is already looming on the horizon: A slowdown in Chinese car sales.

Nikkei Slips as Goldman Slashes Japan's Growth Forecast

Japan's market took yet another beating today when Goldman Sachs lowered its growth forecast for the country's annual gross domestic product. Goldman had previously estimated growth of 1.3%, but has dropped that number down to 0.7% in light of the recent disasters and a slowdown across the country as power cuts and rolling black outs hamper business of all kinds.

The Dangers of Buying on Disasters

Days after Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami, Warren Buffett and Marc Faber pronounced the country's woes a buying opportunity. A cash stampede into U.S.-based Japan exchange-traded funds followed, but these investments carry much greater risks than the average investor probably realized.

What Companies Will Quench Japan's Thirst for Safe Water?

The Japanese are stockpiling bottled water and other drinks after being warned that unsafe levels of radioactive iodine had been found in Tokyo's tap water. That moved investors to jump on the stocks of beverage makers, but only a few companies are in a position to meet Japan's rising demand.

Earthquake, Gas Prices Could Set Back New Car Sales

New car buyers may go on strike -- again. Faced with the rising cost of fuel and parts shortages that could drive up new car prices and make some popular models scarce, consumers in the market for a new car may decide to delay purchases or turn to used cars.

Radiation Risk to U.S. Very Low, Top Expert Explains

As the crisis at Japan's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant continues, some worry that radiation from the damaged reactors will reach U.S. shores. Dr. Edward Maher, president of the Health Physics Society, and an environmental science expert at Harvard, explains why we should breathe easy.

The Bulls Are Optimistic Despite Global Turmoil

Despite turmoil around the world, U.S. markets have been rising again, but is this a temporary bump, or the return of a bull market? The sharp-eyed analysts of Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs say its the latter, and their money is on strong growth ahead.

Japanese Shares Jittery as More Earthquakes Rumble

More bad news in Japan sparked profit taking today. Radioactive iodine has seeped into Tokyo's drinking water and new reports show that the surrounding seawater is also radioactive, which could lead to a ban on seafood if it doesn't dissipate. Today another series of earthquakes rocked Japan, including a 6.6 magnitude tremble.

Is the Market Rally Over, or Is It Just Taking a Breather?

Markets hate uncertainty more than bad news, which is one reason they've swooned: No one can predict the long-term economic effects of Japan's earthquake or Middle Eastern upheaval. But technical analysis looks at the patterns deeper than the daily news, and the charts suggest a real bear ahead.

Japan Disaster Disrupts Global Seafood Industry

Japan, both a major buyer and processor of fish, is an important link in the global seafood distribution chain. So the effects of the disaster -- including the ruined ports, roads, fisheries and processing centers -- have taken their toll on the seafood industry worldwide.