International Monetary Fund

Countries Spending the Most on the Military

The U.S. has a military budget four times larger than China even with a recent decline of more than $40 billion. Find out which countries spend the most on their military.

Behind Cyprus' Plan to Seize Bank Deposits

A plan to seize up to 10 percent of Cypriot's savings has been met with fury and raised concern, if not panic, in the rest of Europe about the security of bank deposits.

Top 10 Business Stories of 2012

This would be the year when the global economy finally regained its vigor. At least that's what many had hoped. It didn't happen. So what were the top ten business stories of 2012?

Markets Nervous as Eurozone Finance Ministers Meet on Greece

Concerns that European finance ministers will again fail to reach an agreement on handing over more bailout cash to Greece weighed on markets Monday. In addition, an election in Spain's Catalonia region that saw separatists gain ground is also adding to global investor worries.

Syria Is Burning, but Still a Better Place to Invest Than Greece

Syria's ongoing civil war has claimed more than 28,000 lives, left 1.5 million people homeless, and sent 500,000 Syrians into exile. But as far as CFOs are concerned, it's still a better place for foreign investment than debt-battered, austerity-riven Greece.

IMF Sharply Downgrades U.S. Economic Outlook

The International Monetary Fund has sharply downgraded its outlook for the U.S. economy through 2012 because of weak growth and concern that Europe won't be able to solve its debt crisis.

Financial Landscape: Banks Get No Love; OPEC Vs. OPEC

As a new week begins on Wall Street, nobody wants bank stocks, J.P. Morgan Chase hints at changes at the top, OPEC ministers tussle over crude, and airlines are in for some financial turbulence. In fact, the only good news is for France, which apparently won't lose the IMF over the DSK scandal.

IMF Lays Out the Challenges Ahead for Global Recovery

In its latest report, the IMF applauds national policymakers for stabilizing credit markets and putting the global economy on a recovery track. However, thorny problems remain -- including how to prevent overheating in emerging markets, and how to cut the U.S. deficit while lowering its unemployment rate.

Why Interest Rates Keep Rising, Despite QE2

The Federal Reserve is doling out billions to buy bonds in hopes of keeping interest rates low and stimulating the economy. However, several powerful forces are working against that low-rate strategy, ranging from investor psychology to global competition for capital.

Ireland's Austerity Budget:
Not Likely to Avoid Default

Despite its planned austerity budget, the long-term solvency of Ireland is still in doubt. Simply put, the losses which Irish taxpayers must cover are larger than the nation's economy can support, making sovereign debt default likely even with a promised bailout from the EU and IMF.

Ireland Deal: Euro-Politics Plays a Major Role

Investors should stay focused on the dynamics within European politics that shaped the rescue. Other indebted economies -- like Spain, Portugal and Italy -- could find themselves in a similar situation, after all. And politics will again guide market moves.

Can China Control an Overheating Economy?

As if the Irish debt crisis weren't enough, investors are worried once again about rising inflation in China. But officials in Beijing are quietly building an impressive record of economic management, and some analysts are convinced they can meet the latest challenge.

Top Economists See Consumers Rebounding Faster

Forget the gloomy predictions: According to Richard Berner of Morgan Stanley, U.S. consumers are a year ahead of schedule in repairing their household balance sheets, giving them the ability to start spending again soon. And the head of the IMF was explicit Monday: A double dip is unlikely.

Europe's Debt Crisis: Here We Go Again?

Europe's shakiest economies managed to ride out a sovereign debt crisis this spring with a lot of help from their more stable neighbors and the major central banks. But with global recovery faltering, the data coming out of Europe suggests we may soon see a replay of the debt default crisis.

Were the European Bank Stress Tests Too Easy?

Banking regulators tested the soundness of 91 European banks this week to see if they could withstand a financial crisis, and only seven failed to pass muster. But some analysts say the tests may have been too easy, and wonder what would happen if a real "worst-case scenario" hit.