InterestRates

The LIBOR Scandal Explained in One Simple Infographic

The LIBOR scandal is being called the "Wall Street scandal of all scandals" but the nature of this massive fraud can be hard to fathom. This nifty infographic from AccountingDegree.net gives non-finance folk an idea of what the scandal is all about.

The $800 Trillion Scandal: How Banks' LIBOR Lies Affected You

The incredible LIBOR rate-rigging scandal is huge, and it's only going to grow in scope: Many of the world's largest banks have already been implicated in manipulating interest rates that are tied to some $800 trillion in loans and securities.

Get Ready, America: The Debt Ceiling Debate Is Back

The U.S. is again closing in on its debt limit, and if a recent statement by John Boehner is any indication, another fight with the Obama administration over the issue is ahead. Here's a preview of what we might expect.

Fed Notes Better Economy, Takes No Policy Action

The Federal Reserve offered a more positive view of the economy after a burst of hiring since its last meeting. It held off taking further steps to boost the recovery and reiterated its plan to keep short-term interest rates near zero until at least late 2014. The Fed's statement issued after Tuesday's one-day meeting was more upbeat than the one it released in January.

Brokerage Credit Cards: Can One Boost Your Portfolio?

It's easy to understand the allure of brokerage credit cards. They're cash-back cards that route the the kickbacks into a brokerage account for capital appreciation. Free money creating more free money: What could possibly go wrong?

Is Your Bank Killing Free Checking?

Wells Fargo stopped offering free checking to new customers in 2010, but if you already had it, they didn't take it away. Now, it's introducing a $7 monthly charge in six (thus far, unidentified) states for customers with those formerly free checking accounts.

Bad 'Dream': Renters Often Do Better than Homeowners

Becoming a homeowner is a rite of passage in America, while renting gets no respect. But when you look at how we really live, it turns out that, even ignoring the recent crash, home ownership isn't the great deal for our finances that we've been led to believe.

The Money-Saving Refi Move You've Never Considered

Millions of homeowners have garnered huge savings in recent years from one simple move: refinancing their mortgages. Now, the refinancing craze has spread to an unexpected industry: car loans. Could an auto refi be a smart move for you?

The Best Place to Put Cash: Extra Mortgage Payments

Eenie, meenie, miney, moe -- where should my cash savings go? That's the riddle many Americans are trying to figure out these days. After the necessities are taken care of, it's time to choose: mattress, stock market or mortgage? Do the math and the answer is clear.

What Makes a Great Balance Transfer Credit Card?

If you're burdened by credit card debt, lenders want to help you -- by adding more plastic to your arsenal in the form of a balance transfer card, which offers generous up-front terms for moving your debt. And some of those offers are much more generous than others.

The Pitfalls of Debt Consolidation Loans

Debt consolidation loans may seem like a great way to manage debt without taking the drastic step of declaring personal bankruptcy, but in many cases the too-good-to-be-true promise of significantly lower monthly payments are just that: an illusion.

The Tricks to Maximizing the Cash-Back Card Payoff

Savers love cash-back cards, which return a fraction of what you spend in good old U.S. currency. Disciplined consumers can bank hundreds of dollars yearly: The key is knowing how to maximize your payback.

Credit Card of the Week: A Rewarding Venture for Some

Banks offer all sorts of credit cards. For the savers, there are cash-back cards. For the indebted, there are balance transfer cards. For the shoppers, there are retail cards. And for travelers like me, there are rewards cards.

Fed Unlikely to Raise Rates Until at Least 2014

The Federal Reserve went further than ever Wednesday to assure consumers and businesses that they'll be able to borrow cheaply well into the future. The Fed pushed back the earliest date for any likely increase in its benchmark interest rate by at least a year and a half, until at least late 2014. It said record-low rates are still needed to help boost an improving but still sluggish economy.

Credit Card of the Week: Simmons First Visa Platinum

Millions of Americans use credit cards, but are we getting the best deals we could? For those who confined their search to the major banks, the answer is probably not. Today, we kick off an ongoing series in which we'll profile some of the best offerings in plastic.

Fed to Regularly Forecast Interest-Rate Changes

In a major shift, the Federal Reserve will start updating the public four times a year on how long it plans to keep short-term interest rates at record lows, according to minutes from its December policy meeting. The first forecast will be included in the central bank's economic projections after its Jan. 24-25 meeting, the minutes said.

5 Ways Europe's Woes Will Hit Your Finances in 2012

By most indications, the U.S. economy is recovering fairly well for the time being. But across the Pond in Europe, another story is unfolding that has the stock market worried -- and it should have your attention, too.