False Advertising

Beer Giants Spar Over Gimmicky Can Claims

Anheuser-Busch InBev says ads for Coors Light, brewed by rival MillerCoors, make false statements about their cans, and its complaint has gone to the Federal Trade Commission.

Big Retailers Fined for Pushing Phony Bamboo Fabrics

Macy's, Amazon and Sears have all agreed to fork over hundreds of thousands of dollars each in fines after the Federal Trade Commission busted them for passing off Rayon fabrics as genuine, environmentally friendly bamboo.

Nokia's Misleading Lumia 920 Ads Create an Ugly PR Picture

"[T]here was no intention to mislead ... we apologize for the misunderstanding." So said a Nokia spokesperson in response to revelations that marketing materials for its forthcoming Lumia 920 smartphone were, at best, misleading and at worst, fraudulent.

Capital One to Refund Customers $150 Million to End Card Probe

Capital One Bank will pay $210 million to settle charges that it pressured credit card customers to buy costly add-on services like payment protection and credit monitoring. About $150 million of that fine will go directly to 2.5 million of its customers.

Financial Scams: The Latest Twists in the Art of the Con

You're not going to fall for the old Nigerian prince scam anymore -- but the fraudsters know that, and they've moved on, too. Here are some financial scams that made the rounds in 2011 -- and will likely be back in some form this year.

Surprise! 'Acne Cure' Phone Apps Don't Work

"When it comes to curing acne, there's no app for that," said Federal Trade Commission Chairman, Jon Leibowitz, in response to a settlement reached on Wednesday between the FTC and three men charged with misleading claims that their smartphone apps could get rid of pimples.

Reebok to Refund $25M to Buyers of 'Toning Shoes'

Reebok's promise that its EasyTone and RunTone shoes could shape your legs and tone your butt sounded too good to be true. That's because they were, said the FTC Wednesday, when it ordered the footwear maker to give $25 million in partial refunds to customers who bought the products based on the inflated claims.

Do 'Famous' and 'Best' Make Us More Likely to Buy?

It's fair to say that lots of companies exaggerate the excellence of their products, but do consumers buy the hype? Do we actually eat at restaurants because they say they're "famous" or patronize a business because it has "the best" on the sign?

Best Buy Settles Overcharging Charges

Electronics retailer Best Buy has agreed to pay $399,000 to settle allegations that it advertised lower prices on its website, then charged customers higher prices at some of its stores.

False Advertising vs. the First Amendment

You know better than to believe everything companies say in ads, but when it comes to claims about the healthfulness of foods and other products, the untruths can reach outrageous levels. The question is: What can a government limited by the First Amendment do to stop them?