Detroit Three

February's Sales Put Carmakers in the Fast Lane

It was a good month for auto sales despite inclement weather across much of the country and surging oil prices. Cars sold near an annual pace of 13 million vehicles. That would make February the best on record since the "cash for clunkers" rebate program in 2009.

Just What Detroit's Revival Doesn't Need Now

As it did in the summer of 2008, when prices at the pump soared above $4 a gallon, big price jumps at the gas pump may give car buyers reason to pause and cause vehicle sales to stall. At least the carmakers now have more fuel-efficient fleets, except for Chrysler, which is still catching up.

GM Withdraws $14 Billion Federal Loan Application

Back in 2009, General Motors applied to the Department of Energy for $14.4 billion in loans to help it manufacture more fuel-efficient vehicles. Today, with the automaker making big strides in turning around its business, GM said it no longer needs or wants the money.

No Longer the 'Big Three,' but They've Stopped Shrinking

With U.S. automotive dominance waning, a new moniker has emerged: the "Detroit Three." But don't count out Ford, GM or Chrysler -- their post-recession future looks strong, thanks to some agonizing restructuring. Now, they can be profitable selling fewer cars.

Chrysler Finds It Can Be Profitable Selling Fewer Cars

The smallest of the Detroit Three, Chrysler has made substantial strides in turning around its business, including lowering the number of vehicles it needs to sell to make a profit. The automaker had pegged 1.65 million as its operating break-even point, but has just lowered this to about 1.5 million vehicles.