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U.S. Hits Borrowing Limit, Moves to Avoid Default

The U.S. government is running up against its $16.4 trillion borrowing limit and is taking steps to avoid default. Reaching the limit Monday sets up another dispute between the White House and Congress over taxes and spending in the new year.

Borrowers Beware: 401(k) Loans Hold a Hidden Risk

If you're in financial trouble, borrowing from your 401(k) may look smart -- at first. There's no application process, and the low interest you pay goes back into your account -- you're paying it to yourself. Unfortunately, those benefits come with a catch.

Get Ready, America: The Debt Ceiling Debate Is Back

The U.S. is again closing in on its debt limit, and if a recent statement by John Boehner is any indication, another fight with the Obama administration over the issue is ahead. Here's a preview of what we might expect.

Good Reasons to Love Those Darn Student Loans

With student loan default rates rising due to persistently high unemployment rates, it's easy to vilify the seemingly endless monthly payments that follow graduation. But take a closer look, and you'll find that the news about student loans is more good than bad.

5 Ways Europe's Woes Will Hit Your Finances in 2012

By most indications, the U.S. economy is recovering fairly well for the time being. But across the Pond in Europe, another story is unfolding that has the stock market worried -- and it should have your attention, too.

It's Europe's Fault: They're Holding Back the Recovery

Many European nations have deficits that make the U.S. look thrifty, and over a year after their problems came to light, they're still holding the worldwide recovery back. But because they share the euro, normal solutions aren't available, which means the EU must bite the bullet and accept an orderly default, or watch matters spiral downward.

Your New iPhone's Defaults Put Your Privacy at Risk

If you care about your privacy at all, you might want to muzzle Siri. The groundbreaking voice-recognition personal assistant on the brand-new Apple iPhone 4S turns out to be quite the chatterbox when you least expect her to be, and doesn't go to sleep when the phone is locked.

Apple: More Cash Than the U.S. Government?

As the debt ceiling insanity in Washington goes on, all that's certain is that the government is rapidly running low on cash to pay the bills. The amount left is now roughly $73.8 billion -- which sounds like a lot, until you realize that Apple's cash reserves are $2 billion more than that.

The Financial Landscape: An Economic Spilt Personality

Is the American recovery fast or slow? Depends on who you ask. The Wall Street Journal sees corporate America merrily rolling along while Main Street suffers. The New York Times warns that Wall Street is about to feel the pinch too. But nobody is all that optimistic about Greece today.

How the Debt Ceiling Issue Will Hit Us in the Wallet

Even the phrase "debt ceiling" sounds like something too far removed from daily life to be of much interest. But ignoring the political battle over this issue would be a mistake: How the government handles the nation's debt limit will directly affect our personal finances in all sorts of important ways.

The Financial Landscape: Moody's Mulls Debt Ceiling

Looks like rough sailing ahead: Moody's warned the GOP that its game of chicken with the debt ceiling risked a downgrade of U.S. debt, and the Labor Department said May hiring took a dive. But there are some things investors can look forward to: a Groupon IPO, and the government selling its last shares of Chrysler.

Foreclosure Prices Dip Again: A State-By-State Look

Bargain hunters looking to snap up foreclosed homes found prices dipped again in the first quarter, with Ohio and Illinois offering the steepest discounts, according to figures released this week. But if you're getting ready to you whip out your checkbook, you may want to wait a bit longer.

What Would the Rapture Do to Real Estate Prices?

Christian broadcaster Harold Camping miscalculated in his prediction that the world was going to end on Saturday. But he's not the only one who thinks the Rapture could be nigh in the not-so-distant future. Which begs the question: Where will those who are left behind hang their hats?

Why You Should Double-Check the Math on Your Mortgage

Attention homeowners with mortgages, whether you're current or in default: Double-check your mortgage bank's math. As recent court testimony explains, there's a real chance that the bank is wrong about how much you owe them, particularly if you're behind on your payments.

Investor Lawsuits Are Raising the Heat on Bank of America for 'Putbacks'

When Countrywide Financial created deeply flawed mortgage-backed securities, it wasn't just selling bad financial products: It was breaking its contracts. Now some ordinary investors are suing Countrywide's buyer, Bank of America, to force it to repurchase those bad mortgages. That's their right, but there's nothing simple about this case, or its ramifications.

The Dow Snaps Its
Two-Day Losing Streak

Stocks closed mixed Friday as better-than-expected earnings from General Electric helped the Dow and S&P 500 snap two-day losing streaks, but the Nasdaq closed lower after disappointing results from Advanced Micro Devices.

The Higher the Debt Ceiling, the Deeper the Hole

When some new members of Congress recently declared their resistance to raising the nation's debt limit, it triggered warnings of "catastrophic consequences." Problem is, the higher this ceiling gets, the deeper the hole that the U.S. is digging itself into.