DOJ

New Details in Hewlett-Packard Pretexting Case

In 2006, tech giant Hewlett-Packard grabbed headlines as it found itself immersed in the middle of a stunning pretexting scandal that would force high-profile resignations, lead to public distrust and plenty of legal action. Since then, the case seemed to have died down. But not so fast ...

What If AT&T's T-Mobile Buyout Gets Shot Down?

Regulators have begun to take a long, hard look at whether the AT&T buyout of T-Mobile would create a quasi-monopoly in the American cellular carrier industry. If those antitrust concerns sink the deal, AT&T could be in real trouble, because cellular is its only clear hope for growth.

Financial Meltdown Accountability: Bring On the Class Actions!

The Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission's report concludes that ineffective regulators and big banks were the primary causes of the financial meltdown. Next stop: Government and class action lawsuits to recoup some of what we all lost, and (please please please) criminal charges against the worst offenders too.

Government Recoups $4 Billion from Health Care Fraud Cases

The government recouped a staggering $4 billion in fiscal 2010 that was stolen from federal health care programs, the departments of Justice and Health and Human Services announced Monday -- the highest annual amount ever. More than half of the fraud money recovered came from drug companies.

Fraud Files: FCPA Enforcement Will Continue to Be Costly

For decades, U.S. companies doing business overseas have had to avoid falling afoul of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which prohibits the bribing of foreign officials. But in the past few years, such corporate misbehavior is receiving more attention and increased enforcement, which is making executives nervous.

Allergan Pays $600 Million to Settle Botox Charges

Pharmaceutical firm Allergan has settled criminal and civil charges that it promoted Botox for uses the FDA hadn't approved, agreeing to pay $600 million and enter into a "corporate integrity agreement." Allergan also dropped its related First Amendment lawsuit against the FDA.

Legal Briefing: U.S. Targets More Rich Tax Cheats

Now that they are nearly done squeezing Swiss bank UBS for information about its wealthy tax-dodging clients, the IRS and the Justice Department are moving on to new tax fraud targets: Clients of London-based bank HSBC Holdings, mostly those with ties to India and Singapore.

Legal Briefing: DOJ May Sue to Block Ariz. Immigration Law

The Department of Justice may file suit Tuesday over Arizona's controversial immigration law, but if the lawsuit is crafted as has been rumored, it will frustrate all sides in the debate, because it avoids the merits of the law and focuses instead on Arizona's lack of authority to enact it.

Legal Briefing: Intel Offers Deal to FTC

Intel has been sued a few times for monopolistic behavior in the chip market, but the current Federal Trade Commission case is different from the others. The FTC isn't seeking monetary damages or penalties: It wants Intel to change how it does business.

Legal Briefing: FCC Won't Force Broadband Competition

In order to enforce net neutrality rules, the FCC is reclassifying ISPs into the same category as phone companies. Now, the agency has the authority to drastically improve broadband competition -- but it won't.

Hidden Crime: Domestic Violence Against Men

Amid the media frenzy over Tiger Woods, a key aspect was overlooked: He was not alone as a male victim of domestic violence. And beyond its physical and psychological costs, domestic violence against men exacts an economic toll.