Consumer Price Index

6 Things That Will Cost More in 2014

Overall inflation is low, but the experts expect prices on a few things will rise far out of proportion to the average in 2014. Here are the the ones you should watch out for.

U.S. Consumers Spend Big in November

U.S. consumer spending posted its largest increase in five months in November, the latest suggestion of sustained strength in the economy as the year winds down.

How 'Chained CPI' Will Hit Your Pocketbook

Obama's new budget proposal includes changing some key inflation calculations to "chained CPI" -- a controversial shift because of the effect it may have on personal finances.

U.S. Consumer Prices Flat in January for 2nd Month

U.S. consumer prices were flat last month, the latest sign inflation is in check. That could give the Federal Reserve leeway to continue its efforts to stimulate growth. Excluding the volatile food and energy categories, core prices rose 0.3 percent in January, pushed up by higher costs for apparel, air fares and rents.

U.S. Consumer Price Index Unchanged in December

Lower gas costs offset more expensive food and higher rents to keep a measure of U.S. consumer prices flat last month. The Labor Department said Wednesday that food prices increased 0.2 percent in December from November. Rents and airline fares also rose. Gasoline prices fell a seasonally adjusted 2.3 percent.

Falling Food, Gas Costs Push U.S. Wholesale Prices Lower Again

U.S. wholesale prices fell for the third month in a row in December, propelled by falling food and gas costs. The drop is the latest evidence inflation is tame, which means consumers have more money to spend. Low inflation also gives the Federal Reserve more freedom to keep interest rates low.

8 Retirement Money Questions for 2013

As 2012 draws to a close, people in or nearing retirement face a stunning set of uncertainties about their finances and even basic health and retirement benefits. Here are 8 pressing money and issues that are bearing down on seniors.

Here's How Washington Is Likely to Trim Our Social Security Benefits

When Congress and President Obama make a budget deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, they're likely to use something called "chained CPI" to tweak how Social Security calculates cost of living adjustments. Here's a plain English explanation of what that means, and how it will effect your retirement.