Coinstar Redbox

Market Minute: Coinstar Profit Drops in Fourth Quarter

Coinstar's fourth-quarter profit fell 27 percent due to poor performance at its new ventures. It forecast disappointing earnings ahead, and its shares tumbled in after-hours trading Thursday. The company owns the Redbox DVD kiosks and its namesake coin-counting sites.

Verizon-Redbox Deal Adds to Online Video Choices

Verizon and Coinstar are joining forces in a new Internet streaming video venture built around Redbox's DVD-rental kiosks. Details are sketchy so far, but it will bundle streaming and DVDs, and it'll probably cost less than dominant player Netflix's service.

What Was Wall St. Thinking (Last Week Ed.)?

The boneheaded move of the week was committed by financial journalists, who collectively decided to blame Netflix's recent price hike for its reduction in subscriber targets -- a bad call indeed. Other head-scratchers included the end of boastful Fidelity Magellan chief Harry Lange's tenure, Cracker Barrel's attempts to evade Biglari Holdings, and Restoration Hardware's IPO.

Redbox Runover in the Works?

There's trouble brewing at Redbox: President Mitch Lowe has announced his resignation, and parent company Coinstar revised its second-quarter revenue outlook downward last week. Here are some key signs consumers and investors should watch to see if the Redbox business model (i.e. kiosk rental machines) is obsolete.

5 Things That Went Wrong at Netflix

It's been a rough day for Netflix (NFLX). Shares of the movie provider opened nearly 10% lower today after it disappointed investors with last...

New at Walmart: Streaming Video Rentals

The retail giant will allow customers to snap up a flick while loading their electronic shopping carts with everything from clothes to tires. The move completes Walmart.com's integration of VUDU, and brings the world's largest public corporation by revenue into direct conflict with Netflix.

Finally, the End of the Line for Blockbuster?

Blockbuster has nearly run out of money again. It wants its bondholders to put up more capital as it wrestles to exit Chapter 11. If some of the bondholders balk, Blockbuster will almost certainly be sold off in parts. But what exactly does it have left to sell?