Coins

US Mint Testing New Metals to Make Coins Cheaper

When it comes to making coins, the Mint isn't getting its two cents worth. In some cases, it doesn't even get half of that. A penny costs more than two cents and a nickel costs more than 11 cents to make and distribute.

Why Is the U.S. Making Money Nobody Wants?

A billion dollars in unwanted American dollar coins sits in specially-made vaults the size of soccer fields in Texas and Baltimore and other undisclosed locations. But why are they just sitting there?

U.S. Mint to Launch $1 James Buchanan Coin

The U.S. mint will launch a $1 coin commemorating President James Buchanan, the 15th president of the United States. The coin will show Buchanan%u2019s portrait with the inscription "JAMES BUCHANAN, IN GOD WE TRUST, 15TH PRESIDENT" and "1857-1861", the U.S. Mint said in a statement. The reverse will show a rendition of the Statue of Liberty with the inscription "UNITED STATES OF AMERICA."

U.S. Mint Faces a Coin Cost Dilemma

The U.S. Mint is facing a big problem with small change: Some coins cost more to make than they're actually worth. It costs 1.6 cents to make a penny, as much as 9 cents to make a nickel, and with billions of coins pressed every year, that really adds up.

New Lincoln penny to debut May 14

Some exciting news going on in the world of coin collecting.

Tomorrow morning, May 14, the new "Indiana" Abe Lincoln penny will be going into...