Cloud Computing

Microsoft Names Nadella as Next CEO

Microsoft names Satya Nadella as its next CEO, ending a longer-than-expected search for a new leader after Steve Ballmer announced his intention to retire in August.

Amazon Inks $600 Million Deal with CIA for Cloud Computing

Amazon has reportedly won a $600 million dollar, 10-year contract to supply cloud computing services to the CIA. The online retailer will help the spy agency build a private cloud infrastructure to keep up with emerging technologies.

Wall Street Watch Friday: Autodesk Crashes

Are architects, engineers and animators in trouble? It's worth asking because Autodesk -- the longtime provider of 3D design, engineering, and architecture software -- posted disappointing quarterly results on Thursday afternoon.

Adobe Can't Photoshop Away Its Own Fading Prospects

Adobe is No. 1 when it comes to arming publishers with the tools to stand out in cyberspace. Adobe Flash, Adobe Acrobat and Adobe Reader are everywhere. But there are big clouds on the horizon for the software company -- and one is the Cloud itself.

iCloud Should Add to the Halo Effect for Apple Devices

On Monday, Apple unveiled iCloud, which will allow users to store digital files on remote servers, and access them through smartphones, PCs or tablets. This should give a boost to iTunes, but that accounts for only about 2% of Apple's value. The real gain will be in how iCloud adds to the appeal of Apple's more lucrative devices.

Steve Jobs, iCloud Still Won't Boost Apple's Stock

Steve Jobs received a standing ovation at Apple's annual Worldwide Developers Conference Monday as the company unveiled its iCloud hosted computing service. But despite Jobs' anticipated participation, investors should not expect a huge upswing in the company's stock, one expert says.

IBM Surges Ahead of Microsoft in Market Value

Microsoft used to be the most valuable tech company in the U.S. based on market capitalization. Apple took that crown away last year. Now, IBM has dropped the Redmond, Wash., giant into third place. So what's IBM doing right, and what's Microsoft doing wrong?

The Year in Tech: Top 10 Highlights of 2010

A broad array of technology news helped define 2010, from the launch of Apple's iPad to the arrival of the app to a supernova of Internet stock gains. Here's a look back at those major stories -- and a glimpse of some highlights you can expect next year.

Motorola Buys Zecter to Drive Motoblur Growth

Motorola snapped up virtual media storage maker Zecter, moving to bolster its Motoblur service and drive growth ahead of its split next month into Motorola Mobility and Motorola Solutions.

Investors Boo Dell's Bid for Compellent

Under the agreement, Dell will pay Compellent investors $27.75 a share in cash. Problem is those investors had bid up the stock to above $34 in anticipation of a much a better offer. If they ultimately reject Dell's deal, it'll be another black eye for the computing giant.

Cloud Computing Is Growing Up, and VCs Are Feeding It

Last week, on-demand-software giant Salesforce.com acquired a cloud software startup called Heroku for $212 million in cash. That's par for the course these days as cloud computing goes from buzzword to reality. And venture capitalists are flocking to put money into the next Heroku.

Standing Cloud Aims to Put the Cloud in Easy Reach

Cloud computing is the new hot trend, but anyone business that has tried to move itself into the cloud has generally been in for a shock. Yes, the cloud may be cheaper than owning servers, but it has its own painful issues. Enter startup Standing Cloud, which wants to make the jump to the cloud into a cake walk.

Microsoft After Ray Ozzie May Be a Little Less Magical

Ray Ozzie, Microsoft's chief software architect, was the perfect visionary foil to strategy-obsessed CEO Steve Ballmer. His entrepreneurial thinking pushed the stodgy software giant into cloud computing and SaaS, and got it back into the mobile OS race. Can anyone fill his soon-to-be-vacated shoes?

Cloud Computing Stocks Take a Breather

Cloud-computing stocks got hammered Wednesday when hosting services provider Equinix lowered its guidance. While the dips may be stomach churning, look at them as opportunities to invest in a field that is likely to grow for the long haul.