Chinese inflation

The Big Picture This Week: Earnings Season, Inflation

As the market breathes a sigh of relief on hopes that Europe isn't going to fall apart and the unemployment picture isn't getting worse, the focus shifts to China and earnings season. But earnings may be overshadowed if inflation data out of China is worse than expected, now that the country has the world's second largest economy.

Can the U.S. Sidestep Growing Global Inflation?

Rising food and energy prices will likely hit America the same way they've hit other countries. Other inflationary forces are more variable from nation to nation. Still, the U.S. can't fully escape rising prices, especially when it comes those common consumer necessities.

Can China Tame Its Inflation Dragon?

To quell its rapidly climbing prices, China has raised interest rates for the third time since October. But the signs are growing that it may not be able to keep the problem under control. And despite the economic threat from inflation, China isn't likely to let its currency rise.

What Does Chinese Inflation Mean for Americans?

China's economy is clearly in the midst of an inflationary pop. And most American consumers might think that will translate directly to the prices we pay here. But once you put U.S.-China trade in a larger context, it becomes clear that this less likely to be the case.

Looking Beyond the Political China-Bashing

The grandstanding is understandable enough for politicians facing an electorate battered by the Great Recession. But China's growth is fueling the strong results that companies continue to deliver. And China's global trade surplus has actually been shrinking.

Shares Slide in Asia as China Vows to Tackle Rising Prices

Asian shares slid Tuesday as investors worry about government efforts to stabilize prices in the People's Republic. China's Shanghai Composite Index tumbled 1.7%, Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index fell 0.9% and in Japan the Nikkei 225 Index slipped 0.6%.

China Should Raise Its Currency Instead of Rates

China's decision to raise rates to contain food and housing price increases is a missed opportunity to move the country toward a more domestic-oriented economy. A higher yuan would slow exports, but it would be a bigger overall benefit to China's economy.