Chinese economy

Wall Street's Week Ahead: Earnings, Housing and the China Question

This week will bring answers to questions that have hung over the market for months: Will slower growth in China put a dent in U.S. companies' income? Will new housing numbers come in strong enough to keep homebuilders flying high? How much did Superstorm Sandy cost insurers? Here's what to watch.

The Big Picture This Week: Earnings Season, Inflation

As the market breathes a sigh of relief on hopes that Europe isn't going to fall apart and the unemployment picture isn't getting worse, the focus shifts to China and earnings season. But earnings may be overshadowed if inflation data out of China is worse than expected, now that the country has the world's second largest economy.

Import Addict: China's Pending Energy Crisis

And you thought we were dependent on foreign oil. China's nearly double-digit growth has become the envy of the world's mature economies, but all that expansion requires fuel. As a result, China is now a net importer not only of oil, but of coal as well. And the trends in Chinese energy consumption don't appear to be turning around anytime soon.

Reading the Tea Leaves of the Shanghai Composite

The Shanghai Composite is as close to a proxy for public firms in China as investors can get, and indexes are believed to reflect where markets think a nation's economy is headed. So what does it mean that, despite China's white-hot growth, the Shanghai Composite has been seriously lagging the S&P 500?

As Japan Slips, China Moves Into Second Place

China has officially bumped Japan as the world's second largest economy. Japan reported its GDP grew only 1.8% last year to $5.47 trillion, while China's climbed 10.3% to $5.88 trillion.

China Now World's No. 2 Economy, Shares Surge

Investors piled into Chinese stocks after news broke that China's GDP surpassed Japan's for 2010, making the People's Republic the world's second largest economy after the U.S. The Shanghai Composite climbed 2.5% and in Hong Kong the Hang Seng gained 1.3%. In Japan the Nikkei 225 Index advanced 1.1%.

Can China Tame Its Inflation Dragon?

To quell its rapidly climbing prices, China has raised interest rates for the third time since October. But the signs are growing that it may not be able to keep the problem under control. And despite the economic threat from inflation, China isn't likely to let its currency rise.

Looking Beyond the Political China-Bashing

The grandstanding is understandable enough for politicians facing an electorate battered by the Great Recession. But China's growth is fueling the strong results that companies continue to deliver. And China's global trade surplus has actually been shrinking.

China Should Raise Its Currency Instead of Rates

China's decision to raise rates to contain food and housing price increases is a missed opportunity to move the country toward a more domestic-oriented economy. A higher yuan would slow exports, but it would be a bigger overall benefit to China's economy.

China Stole the Show in 2010. Next Year May Be Tougher

While the U.S. struggled with near-10% unemployment, China grew at that same pace over the past year. But the country faces massive internal problems that leave it in a far more difficult situation than the praise constantly heaped on it implies.

China to Tighten Monetary Policy in 2011

Chinese leaders say they will tighten monetary policy in 2011, a sign that authorities are increasingly concerned about rising inflation. The Politburo decided that China%u2019s monetary policy should shift "from relatively loose to prudent next year," The New York Times said, citing a report in state news agency Xinhua.

Why Easing the Threat of Currency War Is So Difficult

Investors take note: Despite the calls for order, national policymakers are dealing with an increasingly haphazard scenario loaded with counterproductive results and unintended consequences. The result could be a slide toward protectionism.

Making a Well-Placed Bet on China's Growth

One Chinese company that stands to benefit from China's boom is tiny and little known COGO Group, which provides some of the nuts-and-bolts components and expertise that local manufacturers need to produce high-performance and top-quality products.

Why China Is Becoming
More Assertive

With its economy growing rapidly even as much of the developed world struggles, tensions are mounting. China has recently crossed Japan and India, in addition to ongoing conflicts with the U.S. Fairly or not, China is being singled out as currency manipulator.

Now the No. 2 Economy, What's Ahead for China?

According to one China expert, overtaking Japan as the world's second-largest economy doesn't change the underlying economic issues China must resolve, but it does cement changes that have been rapidly making China a far more important player on the global stage

Fear Is Rising, but Stocks Are Looking Cheap

Plenty of good news may be getting overlooked in a market gripped by one form anxiety after another. That pervasive fear has investors crowding into government bonds. It could also create a good window to get into undervalued stocks.

Chinese Yuan Hits High Against Dollar

China's currency climbed on Friday to its strongest level yet as the country's central bank set its daily official level to new highs against the dollar ahead of the G-20 summit. Beijing had vowed to let the currency fluctuate more, a move that was welcomed by many of the world's large economies.

Wall Street's China Investments Need a Dose of Reality

With China's blistering growth and huge foreign reserves, Wall Street often cites the country in whatever sales lures it throws out for investors. But Beijing rarely cooperates with Wall Street's fantasies. (with video)

What to Watch in China: Will the Yuan Appreciate?

If you want to know what Beijing really believes about China's red-hot economy, its real estate market or the state of the global recovery, forget the numbers that the government can manipulate. Look at whether it allows China's currency to rise against the dollar.

Why Japan's Masayoshi Son Is Winning Big in China

While lots of U.S. companies complain about barriers to success in China, Son's edge is how he adapts to what I call the country's "entrepreneurial ecosystem." Plus, Softbank has capabilities that are ideal for Chinese markets now.

China's Economy Gets
Even Hotter

China's GDP expanded at a greater-than-expected rate in the first quarter, heightening concerns that the world's third-largest economy may be overheating, although consumer prices eased slightly during the period.