Chapter 11 bankruptcy

Atari U.S. Files for Chapter 11 to Separate from French Parent Company

Video game maker Atari's U.S. operations have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in an effort to separate from their French parent company, which is filing a similar motion separately in France. Atari says the move is necessary to secure investments it needs to grow in mobile and downloadable video games.

Seven Retailers on the Financial Brink

Borders isn't the only retailer hoping for a little financial relief these days. It's been a difficult few years for U.S. retailers and even those...

Bankruptcies: Could 2011 Be Even Better Than 2010?

In another bit of good economic news, the list of U.S. business bankruptcies will likely get shorter, and probably less distinguished, in 2011, just as it did this year. Still, several factors beyond an improving economy are also at play here.

A&P Files for Bankruptcy

The Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., better known as A&P, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. It's been a long slow decline for...

National Enquirer Parent Files for Bankruptcy

It's not just mainstream news publications that are have difficulty surviving in the recession. American Media, the parent of tabloids the National Enquirer and Star, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection Wednesday.

Bankruptcy for Blockbuster Could Come This Week

Blockbuster's long anticipated bankruptcy filing is apparently headed down the final stretch and could come by the end of the week. One of the cost-cutting moves the video chain is teeing up calls for 500 to 800 additional store closures beyond the nearly 1,000 it previously planned.

General Growth Properties Files Reorganization Plan

General Growth Properties, the nation's second-largest shopping-mall operator, filed a reorganization plan, seeking to emerge from bankruptcy in October with $7 billion to $8.5 billion in new capital, the company announced Tuesday.

Borders Faces Yet Another Deadline on April 1

April Fools' Day may not be so much fun for Borders. The embattled bookseller faces a $42 million payment to its largest investor, Pershing Square Capital, even as it deals with management upheaval, crushing lease agreements and a flagging stock.