Boston

Restaurants Hold a Credit Card Boycott - With a Twist

Twenty restaurants and cafes in the Boston and Washington, D.C., areas staged a one-day credit card boycott on Tuesday, targeted at interchange fees charged by card issuers. But it wasn't an grassroots, merchant-led event. It was organized by mobile payment processor LevelUp.

5 Winners and Losers of the Week in Business

It's been an interesting week in the world of business, from BlackBerry losing another major client, to travel troubles on land and sea that will cost Tesla and Carnival some serious goodwill. Here's a rundown of this week's biggest wins and loses.

The 10 Most Expensive Cities in the United States

The Council for Community and Economic Research just released its sixth annual city cost-of-living rankings. We'll tell you which cities made its top 10 list, plus the average costs of a few ordinary purchases in each one to help put those expenses in perspective.

How Airlines Prepare for Heavy Weather Like Winter Storm Nemo

As the Northeast braces for Winter Storm Nemo, airlines are already employing a strategy that has served them well: Cancel flights early and keep planes, crews and passengers away from snowed-in airports. Here's what else the airlines are doing.

Market Minute: FAA to Launch Comprehensive Review of Boeing 787

The Federal Aviation Administration is undertaking a comprehensive review of the critical systems of Boeing's 787s, the aircraft maker's newest and most technologically advanced plane, after a fire and a fuel leak earlier this week, the agency said Friday.

Northeast Air Travel Still Stalled, Thousands of Flights Cancelled

Hurricane Sandy grounded more than 18,000 flights, and it will be days before travel gets back to normal. Authorities closed the three big New York airports, and the ripple effects from the shutdown of the nation's busiest airspace are dramatically affecting travelers in cities far and wide.

Wall Street Back in Business After Hurricane Sandy Shutdown

The New York Stock Exchange opened on Wednesday -- because it had to open. In a bit of welcome news for fund managers, investors and even the economy, the company that operates the iconic exchange at 11 Wall Street announced it would not extend its trading shutdown to a third day.

American Spirits: Mike Rowe Pours a Shot of Alcoholic Economic History

In "How Booze Built America," Mike Rowe of "Dirty Jobs" mixes little-known history with economic analysis, puns and many tasty beverages to explain how the American story is really the tale of one nation's love affair with alcohol. Here are a few of Rowe's favorite high points.

Save Time and Money on City Vacations With Tourism Passes

This week in Zagreb, Croatia, I saved 20% on tickets to the ballet. In Paris, I got in free to all the best museums. In London, I skipped the line at Shakespeare's Globe theater. And whether you're traveling to Boston or Berlin, you can do it, too.

Why Oscar de la Renta Is America's Priciest Store

Shoppers at New York's Oscar de la Renta spend more per visit than at any other retail site in the country -- more than $3,000, according to consumer finance website Bundle's "most expensive stores" list. But what pushed that Madison Avenue store above and beyond its high-fashion rivals?

The 10 U.S. Cities Where Parking Is Most Expensive

City dwellers know that finding an affordable downtown parking spot involves cutthroat competition. And in some urban centers, even the winners pay through the nose for a place to stash their cars. Find out where the rates are worst (and the high price we all pay for "free" parking.)

The Most Extravagant Fireworks Displays for July 4

Making the rockets red glare and bombs burst in air isn't cheap. Fourth of July celebrations can cost anywhere from $10,000 to several million dollars. Find out where the most awe-inspiring (and most expensive) fireworks displays can be seen.

In Vegas, the Taxi Game Is Rigged Against Plastic

Credit cards will take a traveler a long way in our cashless society -- as long as that traveler isn't trying to take a cab in Las Vegas. Taxis remain among the last holdouts in U.S. society's transition to plastic, a lesson travel writer Randy Diamond has learned the hard way.

Boston mag's editor out in shake-up

The Globe isn't the only Boston publication in turmoil. A shake-up hit Boston magazine today, with editor James Burnett getting tossed aside after...