By Jason Notte

Your car is a significant investment and should get at least as much consideration as you'd give any other equities.

True, cars depreciate in value as soon as they leave the lot. But unless you decide to drive it until it's a pile of parts (or buy a less reliable model to save money in the short-term), your vehicle with still have significant resale value of tens of thousands of miles down the road. The folks at auto pricing and valuation site Kelley Blue Book note that depreciation costs a car owner more than gas, maintenance or insurance during the first five years of new-car ownership.

Kelley Blue Book has been publishing its residual value guide since 1981 and has been handing out Best Resale Value Awards since 2003.

The 2014 model year favored Toyota (TM), much as it did last year and much to the chagrin of Detroit Three loyalists. Toyota and its Lexus division were named Best Brand and Best Luxury Brand, respectively, for their ability to retain their cars' value over the first five years of ownership. Despite the automaker's spate of recalls, Toyota took five out of KBB's 22 vehicle categories, while Lexus won two of three luxury categories (the Audi (AUDVF) A5 won Luxury Car) and best Hybrid/Alternative Energy Car for its Lexus ES 300h.

Though rivals Nissan, Subaru and Honda (HMC) took the small and midsized car categories, Honda took best plug-in vehicle, and Toyota won both midsize and full-size pickup honors, the Detroit automakers weren't completely shut out. The Chevrolet Corvette won Best High Performance Car, while the Chevy Camaro beat the Porsche (POAHF) Cayman for Best Sports Car.

There aren't a whole lot of vehicles out there that give car-buyers the majority of their investment back five years later. According to Kelley Blue Book, the following vehicles are a your best chance of getting half of your money back -- or more -- once it's time to sell:


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teabuster2

A lot of times you're better off in the long run to buy a new vehicle: used vehicles a great deal of the time, are just way too over priced for what you get. .

July 08 2014 at 10:03 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to teabuster2's comment
mac2jr

If you are a Senior Citizen on Social Security who is paying rent or a mortgage, insurances, food, utilities, etc., you not only do not have the money for the down payment, or the 60 to 84 months of payment for a new vehicle, but have the cash for a used car that has less than 170,000 miles on it.

July 08 2014 at 11:04 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
unitedpaintings

Hard to buy a car with your EBT Card isn't it?

July 08 2014 at 5:51 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
mac2jr

2014 cars, the SUV, Hyndai Santa Fe is # 1, and the Dodge Caravan is rated # 2, followed by Honda, Ford, Toyota, Chev, and such..

July 07 2014 at 11:18 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
egoad25236

My rule. Never pay more than $10,000 for a vehicle. I am driving a 1997 Buck Lesabre with 215,000 miles on it. I also have a 1994 Chevy 4WD pickup with 135,000 miles on it. People ask me when I plan on getting a new car. The answer is never. I look for a good 10 year old car with 100,000 miles or less. Usually I drive models that old people drive because I can find them with low miles. My kids aggravate me about it, but I don't care.

July 07 2014 at 8:48 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
seminoleagle

Wrong

The land rover series are selling above initial sticker price if you can get one.

July 07 2014 at 5:49 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
mac2jr

Which will cost more to :

Change oil?
Change Plugs?
Change Brakes?
Troubleshoot the iginition system?

A Dodge or a Toyota?

July 07 2014 at 5:25 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
mac2jr

Toyota new $30,000, 1 year depreciation to $27,000, 2nd to $26,000, 3rd to $25,000, 4 to $24,000, 5 to $23,000, 6 to $22,000, 7 to $21,000, 8th year to $1,500

U.S.A. vehicle $30,000, 1 year depreciation to $26,000, 2nd to $22,000, 3rd to $18,000, 4 to $14,000, 5 to $10,000, 6 to $6,000, 7 to $2,000, 8th year to $1,500.

Now please answer me as to how this can be? The simple answer is that both vehicles are built in America, with the same parts, by the same people, and maybe on the same production lines.

The way this happens is simple, the public is being CHEATED by the Toyota Company in that the value is being artificially held high, even as the overall value of the vehicle is falling.

If the U.S.A. companies did the same you would be yelling like crazy that you are being cheated. But, guess what, maybe the American Brands should copy the Toyota and CHEAT, then people will believe that America Cars are better...

Wake up America, WAKE UP... please...

July 07 2014 at 5:22 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to mac2jr's comment
dopey.obamite

Who are you talking to?

July 07 2014 at 9:37 PM Report abuse -2 rate up rate down Reply
migellc

I don't know But I guess they missed the VOLVO's Cars and Trucks even. Hope they do include these on the first 3 of the list and very probably it might easily be the first of all worldwide level. Believe you Me!

July 07 2014 at 4:29 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
ferebot

Just buy a Toyota Camry!

I drive a '99 Toyota Camry handed down from my father-in-law who bought it new. I do my own maintenance so there's minimal maintenance costs, no depreciation, low insurance ($25/month from Insurance Panda) and registration costs, no car wash expenses (I park it outside when it's raining) and people think twice before trying to cut in front of me. It's a comfortable ride on the highway but is also nimble on dirt roads. I could easily afford a new car but then I'd have to fuss about dents, scratches, car washes and all those other costs. It's got a 3.1L V6 that achieves 30 mpg on the highway. As long as it continues to pass smog it's a keeper.

July 07 2014 at 2:24 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
alfredschrader

The condition of a vehicle has more to do with the retention of resale value than the make or model. If you ever get a chance take a quick drive through Fort Lauderdale and check out the vehicles parked on the estates. Nearly all of them look like you just drove them out of the showroom even the 15 year old Rolls or 10 year old Buicks.
The finish on most cars will look like new for decades if you wash it gently and keep it waxed.
And use protectant on the rubber and plastic parts - I prefer Vaseline applied gently with a shammie or soft paint brush. You can do this to your entire car in an hour.
Spray Turtle Wax is the easiest to use- no elbo grease required - it's a wipe off liquid.

July 07 2014 at 1:42 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
rgkarasiewicz

In regards to the Big Domestic Three vehicles (in so far as the quality and safety issues associated with them are concerned), the bigger question would be whether one could even peddle those used junkers in a private sale (because of the inherent liabilities).

In many cases, the only viable options would be to either trade those junkers in, or tow them to Joe Brown.

July 07 2014 at 1:25 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply