Will Good Friday Bring a Better Monday?

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Dow Continues Three Day Streak
Andrew Burton/Getty Images
By Pradip Sigdyal

The S&P 500 (^GPSC) this week had its best weekly gain since July, up about 3 percent, but if history is any indication, those gains may evaporate on Monday.

Monday's have been a tough day for stocks this year with indexes closing negative over 67 percent of the time, and after a Good Friday, stocks still may not find a relief.

Historically, U.S. stocks tend to trade down on the Monday following a Good Friday, with the Nasdaq composite (^IXIC) leading the biggest decline.

Since the inception of Nasdaq in 1971, the index posted a loss over 62 percent of the time, down on average 0.33 percent.

Other major indexes -- the Dow (^DJI) and S&P 500 also followed suite with losses over 55 percent of the time on Monday following the holiday.

On a positive note, stocks tend to trade up the week after.

Not surprisingly, Nasdaq has led the market with gains over half a percent while the Dow and S&P followed with modest gains over 0.2 percent.

The markets have been closed now for more than 100 years since the last time they opened on Good Friday in 1907.

Here's a look at how indexes performed the week after the observance of this religious holiday in the last 14 years:

Week After Good Friday
Year DJIA S&P 500 Nasdaq
2000 -1.02 1.25 5.95
2001 4.47 5.03 10.3
2002 -1.27 -2.15 -4.08
2003 -0.38 0.59 0.63
2004 0.1 -0.41 -2.78
2005 -0.37 0.13 -0.31
2006 1.88 1.72 0.72
2007 0.41 0.63 0.83
2008 -1.17 -1.07 0.14
2009 0.59 1.52 1.24
2010 0.64 1.38 2.14
2011 2.44 1.96 1.89
2012 -1.61 -1.99 -2.25
2013 -0.09 -1.01 -1.95
Average 0.33 0.54 0.89


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