On Monday, European plane maker Airbus  released its official list of prices for all aircraft in its fleet in 2014. The company noted that prices this year have been raised about 2.6% on average, a smaller percentage price hike than Airbus announced last year, when the increase was 3.6%. These new prices have been in effect since Jan. 1.

Model

2014 Average List Prices (in Millions)

A318

$71.9

A319

$85.8

A319neo (new engine option)

$94.4

A320

$93.9

A320neo

$102.8

A321

$110.1

A321neo

$120.5

A330-200

$221.7

A330-200 Freighter (i.e., configured for cargo)

$224.8

A330-300

$245.6

A350-800

$260.9

A350-900

$295.2

A350-1000

$340.7

A380

$414.4


Among the more notable numbers, Airbus would now have the lowest-priced 100-person plus jet on the market if it were still competing only with Boeing . However, Bombardier's new CS100, which carries 110 passengers, costs less than Airbus A318 at its most recent published list price of $62 million.

More generally, Boeing continues to hold the pricing edge among single-aisle regional jets, based on its most recent published price list. Its conventionally engined 737-900ER costs $96.1 million to the A321neo's $110.1 million. And in the new generation of regional jetliners, Boeing's 737 MAX 9 sells for $109.9 million, a discount to the $120.5 million A321neo. Many customers don't end up paying list prices as the planemakers can give discounts for large orders.


Among wide-body jets, Boeing may also have an edge in some markets. The largest Airbus A350 variant, the A350-1000, sells for a steep $340.7 million, compared to either Boeing's 787-10 ($288.7 million) or its 777-300ER ($320.2 million). Airbus' line of cheaper A330 planes, however, selling as they do in the low-to-mid $200 millions, may have an easier time competing with Boeing's pricier wide-body offerings.

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The article Airbus Raises Plane Prices for 2014 originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Rich Smith has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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