Teva Pharmaceuticals announced today its acceleration of its cost reduction program, with plans to lay off around 5,000 workers in 2014 to help pull $2 billion in annual savings by 2018. The company had originally expected to save $1.5 billion to $2.0 billion annually.

The decision comes as an add-on to its previous downsize plans, originally announced in December 2012. In addition to divesting non-core assets, focusing on efficiency, and cutting down on excess capacity, the company's layoffs will reduce its global workforce by approximately 10%, allowing Teva to focus on its generic business and core R&D programs.

President and CEO Jeremy Levin said in a statement:

Teva is managing its operations to achieve high levels of effectiveness in the short term, while pursuing opportunities for the long term. The accelerated cost reduction program will strengthen our organization while improving our competitive position in the global marketplace. We understand that this may be a difficult time for our employees and are committed to act with fairness, integrity and respect, and provide support during this time.


Teva expects to snag $1 billion in savings by the end of 2014, and estimates its overall restructuring costs to clock in around $1.1 billion. The company reconfirmed its 2013 non-GAAP revenue range of $19.5 billion to $20.5 billion, and non-GAAP adjusted earnings at $4.85 to $5.15 per share.

The article Teva Speeds Up Downsize: 5,000 Layoffs by 2015 originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Justin Loiseau has no position in any stocks mentioned. You can follow him on Twitter @TMFJLo and on Motley Fool CAPS @TMFJLo. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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