The Department of Defense announced $2.61 billion worth of contracts on Tuesday in 52 separate awards, setting yet another record for the year. Many of the day's biggest contracts went not to traditional "defense contractors" but rather to non-profit medical providers such as Johns Hopkins Medical Services and Saint Vincent's Catholic Medical Centers. But for-profit publicly traded companies got their fair share of the Pentagon's dollars as well.

  • Communications specialist Harris Corp did especially well, winning a $140.7 million firm-fixed-price, non-option-eligible, non-multiyear contract for the production of Mid-Tier Networking Vehicular (MNVR) radios for the U.S. Army. Other contractors did not win contracts quite so lucrative.
  • Britain's BAE Systems won an $8.6 million option exercise requiring it to provide a "full range" of ordnance handling and management services to the U.S. Navy in both "peacetime and wartime" through Sept. 30, 2014.
  • Government contractor Booz Allen Hamilton won a $6.8 million cost-plus-fixed-fee contract to provide the Air Force, the Department of Defense, and the intelligence community with software required for the "study, analysis, engineering, design, development, modeling, simulation, integration, testing, demonstration and transition of cyber and multi-level capabilities." This contract runs through Sept. 23, 2016.
  • Chicago Bridge & Iron subsidiary Shaw Environmental & Infrastructure was awarded a $6.7 million contract modification, increasing the maximum dollar value on a previously awarded task order to inspect and repair pipelines at the Defense Fuel Supply Point, Naval Base in Guam. This task should be completed by September 2014.
  • Hamilton Sundstrand -- now the United Technologies subsidiary known as UTC Aerospace Systems¬† -- was awarded a $6.6 million firm-fixed-price, non-option-eligible, non-multiyear contract to supply flight control computers for U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopters.

 

The article Pentagon Awards $2.61 Billion in Contracts Tuesday originally appeared on Fool.com.

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