Teachers crave parent helpers. So when my eldest son's eighth-grade Algebra teacher found out that I write about investing, she enlisted my help teaching her teen students about stocks.

Accepting was a no-brainer. Here at the Fool, we've spent years loudly bemoaning the state of financial education in the U.S., and for good reason. Research strongly suggests that millions of Americans lack even the most rudimentary form of financial literacy. Teaching our children better habits is key to solving the problem, I think.

The following slideshow is my attempt to help not just my son and his peers but also any teen better understand stocks and investing. Please read and comment, since we can all benefit from ideas for helping our kids growing up smarter about money.


What if you're a working adult who needs help? Don't fret. Our analysts have created a special report that introduces you to the basics of stock and fund investing. Click here to claim your free copy now.

The article How to Introduce Your Teen to Stocks and Investing originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Tim Beyers is a member of the  Motley Fool Rule Breakers stock-picking team and the Motley Fool Supernova Odyssey I mission. He owned shares of Apple and Netflix at the time of publication. He was also long January 2014 $50 Netflix call options. Check out Tim's Web home and portfolio holdings, or connect with him on Google+Tumblr, or Twitter, where he goes by @milehighfool. You can also get his insights delivered directly to your RSS reader.The Motley Fool recommends and owns shares of Apple and Netflix. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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