Why Apple's Upcoming Macs Will Go to Waste

Next month, Apple  is expected to unveil upgraded Macs, most likely in the form of MacBooks. The company will likely bump internal specs with no major external changes. Among these improvements may be the inclusion of Broadcom's newest Wi-Fi combo chips. Thanks to these chips, the new models may support the newest Wi-Fi standard, 802.11ac, that offers theoretical maximum speeds of 1,000 megabits per second, or Mbps.

That speed capability will go to waste, as the average American's Internet speed is approximately 6 Mbps, according to Google's estimates. The search giant's Fiber service is a gigabit service that could reach those theoretical maximums. Google is catalyzing the industry with its disruptive threat, and eventually users may be able to tap into gigabit Wi-Fi.

In the video below, Fool contributor Evan Niu, CFA, explains why the move may not do users any good for now.

There's no doubt that Apple is at the center of technology's largest revolution ever, and that longtime shareholders have been handsomely rewarded with over 1,000% gains. However, there is a debate raging as to whether Apple remains a buy. The Motley Fool's senior technology analyst and managing bureau chief, Eric Bleeker, is prepared to fill you in on reasons to buy and reasons to sell Apple, and what opportunities are left for the company (and your portfolio) going forward. To get instant access to his latest thinking on Apple, simply click here now.


The article Why Apple's Upcoming Macs Will Go to Waste originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Evan Niu, CFA, owns shares of Apple. The Motley Fool recommends Apple and Google. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple and Google. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Copyright © 1995 - 2013 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


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