Recent estimations put Microsoft Windows RT selling at an anemic rate of only 50,000 units per month. For a company the size of Microsoft, this is doing next to nothing to its bottom line, not to mention it's tarnishing the Windows 8 franchise with added confusion for consumers. Given the fact the Intel is on the verge of releasing a tablet processor based on a 22-nanometer design, it's almost all but certain that Windows RT will eventually become a thing of the past. In the video, Motley Fool contributor Steve Heller discusses why he believes Windows RT needs to die and where he wants Microsoft to focus its efforts.

It's been a frustrating path for Microsoft investors, who've watched the company fail to capitalize on the incredible growth in mobile over the past decade. However, with the release of its own tablet, along with the widely anticipated Windows 8 operating system, the company is looking to make a splash in this booming market. In this brand-new premium report on Microsoft, our analyst explains that while the opportunity is huge, the challenges are many. He's also providing regular updates as key events occur, so make sure to claim a copy of this report now by clicking here.


The article Windows RT Needs to Die originally appeared on Fool.com.

Erin Miller has no position in any stocks mentioned. Fool contributor Steve Heller owns shares of Intel. The Motley Fool recommends Intel. The Motley Fool owns shares of Intel and Microsoft. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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