It's been rumored that Google might be releasing a version of its Nexus 7 tablet for a rock-bottom price of $149 -- $10 below what Amazon charges for its Kindle Fire tablet. Considering the fact that the Amazon ecosystem undermines Google's search engine and app store, this move appears to be an effort to mitigate the threat from Amazon's low-cost stronghold. In this video, Motley Fool contributor Steve Heller discusses what the prospect of a $149 Nexus 7 tablet could mean for Google investors and what to keep an eye on going forward.

As one of the most dominant Internet companies ever, Google has made a habit of driving strong returns for its shareholders. However, like many other web companies, it's also struggling to adapt to an increasingly mobile world. Despite gaining an enviable lead with its Android operating system, the market isn't sold. That's why it's more important than ever to understand each piece of Google's sprawling empire. In The Motley Fool's new premium research report on Google, we break down the risks and potential rewards for Google investors. Simply click here now to unlock your copy of this invaluable resource.


The article Is Google Trying to Stop the Amazon Threat? originally appeared on Fool.com.

Erin Miller has no position in any stocks mentioned. Fool contributor Steve Heller owns shares of Google. The Motley Fool recommends Amazon.com and Google. The Motley Fool owns shares of Amazon.com, Google, and Microsoft. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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