- Days left

Dancers Protest Washington 'Dance Tax'

×
State tax codes are packed with weird tax laws that subject consumers and businesses to taxes on everything from hot air balloon rides to sliced bagels. Now taxpayers in Washington state are protesting one such law through the healing power of dance.

The tax law in question was put on the books in the 1960s, and says that any business that offers customers the "opportunity" to dance will be subject to a tax. According to ABC News, many Washington businesses complain of arbitrary enforcement of the statute. The state legislature is considering a repeal.

So on Monday, taxpayers descended on the state Capitol in Olympia, Wash., to protest the law with various dance moves. ABC News reports that the flamenco, salsa, tango and conga line all made appearances during the spirited protest.

But Washington's is hardly the only strange tax law on the books: Check out the slide show below for some truly odd revenue-generating statutes:


Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

How Financial Planners go Grocery Shopping

Learn to shop smart and save.

View Course »

Intro to different retirement accounts

What does it mean to have a 401(k)? IRA?

View Course »

TurboTax Articles

Video: How to Claim the Affordable Care Act Premium Tax Credit (Obamacare)

The Affordable Care Act Premium Tax Credit is a new refundable tax credit that can lower your monthly health insurance premiums. If you qualify for the tax credit, you can claim the Premium Tax Credit throughout the year to lower your monthly health insurance premiums, or claim the credit with your tax return to either lower your overall tax bill or increase your tax refund.

Cities With the Highest and Lowest Taxes

Geography has a lot to do with personal finance, and where you live in the United States has an impact on your annual tax burden. While federal income taxes are assessed in a consistent manner coast to coast, state and municipal taxes, such as sales and property taxes, vary widely.

When the IRS Classifies Your Business as a Hobby

If your business claims a net loss for too many years, or fails to meet other requirements, the IRS may classify it as a hobby, which would prevent you from claiming a loss related to the business. If the IRS classifies your business as a hobby, you'll have to prove that you had a valid profit motive if you want to claim those deductions.

Hurricane Sandy Tax Relief

Several tax provisions were put in effect to help taxpayers who live or do business in areas affected by Hurricane Sandy - but a number of those provisions expired on Feb. 1, 2013.

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum

2 Comments

Filter by:
lambsarty

Shows one just how stupid our politicans were even then what a waste of laws.

April 06 2013 at 8:27 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Buckingham's

WHAT kind of crap is this? More and more, these corrupt lawmakers are thinking up ways to gouge the American people, and the citizens of Washington state. Lighten up!

April 05 2013 at 7:56 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply