4 Stocks That Have Almost Doubled in 2013

There were only a handful of companies that managed to double this past quarter, but there were plenty of interesting companies that came close.

The market's off to a hot start. The S&P 500 rose 10% through the first three months of 2013, but now let's take a look at some of the stocks that fared considerably better than the market without actually doubling.

Albany Molecular Research -- Up 99%
The drug developer's run began in February, when Albany Molecular reversed a year-ago loss by posting a larger profit than Wall Street was expecting on a beefy 44% uptick in revenue.


Albany Molecular's outlook was just as impressive, targeting adjusted earnings to clock in between $0.34 a share and $0.50 a share for all of 2013.

Albany Molecular strikes development and manufacturing deals with other medical companies, opening the door for potential upside in the future. However, it's also generating royalties from allergy drug Allegra, so investors are being rewarded now, too.

Zillow -- Up 97%
No one should be surprised by Zillow's amazing run this year. Real estate is hot, and homeowners are turning to Zillow to see how much their properties could be worth as prospective home buyers are scouring for the best deals before prices move even higher.

Zillow was growing even when the real estate market was collapsing, but it's on fire these days.

Zillow attracted an average of 34.5 million unique monthly users during the final quarter of last year, 47% ahead of where it was a year earlier. More than half of Zillow's traffic is now coming from its industry-leading mobile app.

Trulia -- Up 93%
What's good for Zillow is also good for smaller rival Trulia.

Trulia has also seen traffic to its site climb by roughly 50% over the past year as deal seekers turn to sites that offer more than dull property listings.

Trulia went public at $17 back in September, but it wasn't exactly a hot IPO. Trulia's stock actually closed out 2012 just below its original price tag. However, as home prices firm up and potential buyers try to lock in deals before mortgage rates start climbing, the past few months have been model-affirming for both Trulia and Zillow.

Best Buy -- Up 87%
It was a good time to be one of the consumer electronics retailers that 2012 left for dead. RadioShack -- one of last year's biggest laggards -- began to claw back from last year's 78% plunge with a 58% surge this past quarter.

However, it's Best Buy that's been leading the charge of the walking dead.

Best Buy helped its cause by cranking out a holiday quarter that wasn't as horrendous as worrywarts once feared. Sales stabilized, and Best Buy's new CEO and its Renew Blue strategy appear off to a commendable start.

Best Buy will still have its challenges in 2013, but with its founder now back on good terms with the company and the economy showing signs of life, even a forgotten retailer can manage to show a pulse these days.

The Motley Fool's chief investment officer has selected his No. 1 stock for the next year. Find out which stock it is in the brand-new free report: "The Motley Fool's Top Stock for 2013." Just click here to access the report and find out the name of this under-the-radar company.

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The article 4 Stocks That Have Almost Doubled in 2013 originally appeared on Fool.com.

Longtime Fool contributor Rick Munarriz has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends Zillow. The Motley Fool owns shares of RadioShack and Zillow. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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