The following video is from Friday's Motley Fool Money roundtable discussion, in which host Chris Hill and analysts Charly Travers, James Early, and Jason Moser break down the biggest investing stories of the week.

On Monday, New York Judge Milton Tingling blocked the New York City ban on large-size sugary drinks, calling the ban "arbitrary and capricious." In this installment of Motley Fool Money, our analysts discuss the ruling and the implications for companies such as Coca-Cola , PepsiCo , Starbucks , Dunkin' Brands , and Whole Foods Market .


PepsiCo has quenched consumers' thirst for more than a century. But recently, the company has left shareholders craving more. With increased competition and loss of market share, many investors wonder if this global snack food and beverage giant is simply fizzling out. Are more bland results ahead for PepsiCo? In The Motley Fool's brand-new premium report on the company, we guide you through everything you need to know about PepsiCo, including the key opportunities and threats facing the company's future. Simply click here now to claim your copy today.

The relevant video segment can be found between 5:05 and 7:09.

The article A Sweet Victory for Sugar Stocks originally appeared on Fool.com.

Charly Travers has no position in any stocks mentioned. James Early owns shares of PepsiCo. Chris Hill owns shares of Coca-Cola and Starbucks. Jason Moser owns shares of Starbucks. The Motley Fool recommends Coca-Cola, PepsiCo, Starbucks, and Whole Foods Market and owns shares of PepsiCo, Starbucks, and Whole Foods Market. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Copyright © 1995 - 2013 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


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