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7 Money Moves You Should Never Hide From Your Tax Preparer

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Tax preparer
Two women consult with a volunteer tax preparer. (ZUMAPress)
By MANDI WOODRUFF

Not to be pessimistic, but it's safe to assume that not every taxpayer is 100 percent truthful when it comes time to fill out their tax returns.

In a 2011 IRS report, twice as many Americans (8%) said a little fibbing on tax returns is fine compared to the same survey issued in 2010.

And although it's true that the IRS doesn't exactly go after "small potatoes" taxpayers for fibs (generally, you'd need at least $1 million in assets to interest their auditors), even a few missing details could put your refund in jeopardy.

Whether you're going solo or working with a tax professional this year, transparency is the key to getting the maximum refund –– and keeping auditors off your tail.

Here are seven "confessions" we recommend making soon if you haven't already:





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