4 "Buy Now" Stocks From the World's Greatest Growth Portfolio

November 2012 has come and gone, and that means we only have one month left in the year. So far, including dividends reinvested, the S&P 500 has returned 14.2%. That's definitely above average, and nothing to be discouraged with

And yet, if you had used my hypothetical "World's Greatest Growth Portfolio" as a guide, you would be up 23.2%. It's only been 11 months, so I'm not declaring victory anytime soon, but the results so far speak for themselves.

Below, I'll identify four stocks that I think are buys right now, and offer access to a special premium report on one of the stocks in my portfolio.

Core

Company

Allocation

Jan. 1st balance

Current balance

Change

Intuitive Surgical 

11.5%

 $115.00

 $130.87

13.8%

Google 

11.5%

 $115.00

 $122.94

6.9%

Amazon.com 

11.5%

 $115.00

 $167.67

45.8%

Whole Foods  (NAS: WFM)

11.5%

 $115.00

 $153.07

33.1%

Tier One

lululemon athletica 

7.5%

 $75.25

 $113.85

51.3%

Apple  (NAS: AAPL)

7.5%

 $75.25

 $107.91

43.4%

Westport Innovations  (NAS: WPRT)

7.5%

 $75.25

 $60.43

-19.7%

IPG Photonics 

7.5%

 $75.25

 $134.55

78.8%

Tier Two

Baidu  (NAS: BIDU)

5%

 $50.00

 $38.75

-22.5%

Zipcar 

5%

 $50.00

 $30.55

-38.9%

Stratasys 

5%

 $50.00

 $113.40

126.8%

MAKO Surgical 

5%

 $50.00

 $27.00

-46%

Solazyme 

5%

 $50.00

 $31.20

-37.6%

 

       

Total

100%

 $1,000.00

 $1,232.17

23.2%


Source: Fool.com

Of course, the above is just a hypothetical portfolio starting out with a $1,000 allocation, but it illustrates that it is possible to outperform the S&P 500 with a selection of quality companies... and a little luck.

If you're interested in seeing the companies I'm considering putting in 2013's "World's Greatest Growth Portfolio," I've got a page with links to all of the companies available right here . Many of them already in the portfolio will be staying, while I will be parting ways with a select few.

But for this month's best buys, read below.

Best buys for your money right now
Westport Innovations is a company that I plan on keeping in the portfolio next year, though likely not with as heavy an allocation. The company -- which designs engines that can run on natural gas -- has yet to turn a profit, and faces the possibility  of its joint-venture partners deciding to design one of their own engines instead of partnering with Westport.

Those factors, along with the company warning that revenue would be lighter than expected, has the stock down 45% from its mid-March highs. But a closer look at the revenue warning shows that it's not that customers aren't interested in the engines -- it's that they are worried that the infrastructure isn't in place. That isn't necessarily under Westport's control, and many companies such as Clean Energy Fuels (NAS: CLNE)  are working to build out that infrastructure. At today's prices, I see Westport as worthy of buy status.

Second on this list is Chinese search engine Baidu. Though it has continued to put up impressive growth in both revenue and earnings, investors are wary of competition from Qihoo 360, as well as a recent announcement by the SEC. The latter involved the government agency saying that it would be investigating the Chinese branches of the Big Four auditors.

If foul play has actually occurred and it involves Baidu, that could be very bad. But with the information available right now, I see a market leader in a country with a growing number of Internet users trading at just 15 times future earnings.

Third on my list is Apple. Sure, the company might not be the world's greatest forever -- that's somewhat inevitable. But it is surely still one of the most innovative, with a religious cult following and an iOS ecosystem that makes switching costs higher than you might think. You can buy shares in the company for less than 10 times 2013 earnings, which, in my book, is dirt cheap.

Finally, we have Whole Foods. Yes, the company is a grocer, but it's really so much more than that: It's the leader of a movement that brings us back toward a closer relationship with what we put into our bodies. And its business isn't doing too bad, either. The company may trade for a high premium, but with only one-third of its eventual stores built and same-store sales showing a strong 8.5% improvement over the past year, I see lots of reasons to consider adding Whole Foods.

Dig Deeper

It's hard to believe that a grocery store could book investors more than 30 times their initial investment, but that's just what Whole Foods has done for those who saw the organic trend coming some 20 years ago. However, it may not be too late to participate in the long-term growth of this organic foods powerhouse.

In this brand-new premium report on the company, we walk through the key must-know items for every Whole Foods investor, including the main opportunities and threats facing the company. We're also providing a full year of regular analyst updates to go with it, so make sure to claim your copy today by clicking here.

The article 4 "Buy Now" Stocks From the World's Greatest Growth Portfolio originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Brian Stoffel owns shares of Apple, Amazon.com, Google, Intuitive Surgical, Stratasys, lululemon athletica, Whole Foods Market, Westport Innovations, IPG Photonics, MAKO Surgical, Zipcar, Solazyme, and Baidu. The Motley Fool owns shares of Apple, Amazon.com, Baidu, Clean Energy Fuels, Google, IPG Photonics, Intuitive Surgical, lululemon athletica, MAKO Surgical, Stratasys, Solazyme, Whole Foods Market, Westport Innovations, and Zipcar. Motley Fool newsletter services recommend Apple, Amazon.com, Baidu, Clean Energy Fuels, Google, IPG Photonics, Intuitive Surgical, lululemon athletica, MAKO Surgical, Stratasys, Whole Foods Market, Westport Innovations, and Zipcar. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Copyright © 1995 - 2012 The Motley Fool, LLC. All rights reserved. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


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