Ford Increases Its Presence in China

Ford has recently made an announcement that Lincolns will be solid in China beginning in 2014, which will help Ford increase their international presence in a market where GM is the overall market share leader. It will be a challenge for Lincoln in an increasingly competitive luxury market featuring German brands Audi, BMW, and Mercedes, which combined hold around 80% of the luxury car market. Still, this is the right move for Ford, which needs to increase its presence in the world's biggest auto market to hit its goal of 8 million vehicles sold by 2015. Check out the video below for Fool.com Industrials Editor Brendan Byrnes' full take on the move. 

Ford has been performing incredibly well as a company over the past few years. It's making good vehicles, is consistently profitable, recently reinstated its dividend, and has done a remarkable job paying down its debt. But Ford's stock price is down over 20% over the past year. Does this create an incredible buying opportunity, or are there hidden risks with the stock that investors need to know about? To answer that, one of our top equity analysts has compiled a premium research report with in-depth analysis on whether Ford is a buy right now, and why. Simply click here to get instant access to this premium report.

Andrew Tonner owns shares of Ford. Brendan Byrnes owns shares of Ford and General Motors. The Motley Fool owns shares of Ford. Motley Fool newsletter services recommend Ford and General Motors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

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