Meet the Company That's Disrupting Apple and Google

Raise your hand if you use a Mac, but also like Android-driven geekery. (Counts.) Hmmm, that's a fair number of you. Privately-held BlueStacks has something you might like.

At this week's I/O developer conference, the company introduced Android App Player for Mac OS X. Install the environment, and you'll get a variety of pre-loaded Android apps and the option to download more. But be warned: the software is still in alpha testing, which means there are plenty of bugs still to be found and swatted.

Expect a more stable version soon enough. BlueStacks already has a beta version for Windows, which received accolades at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in January, and from CNET's editors since. There's every reason to believe the Mac version will be just as impressive.


How do Apple (NAS: AAPL) and Google (NAS: GOOG) look at the App Player? I've yet to see comments from either company, and while BlueStacks technically launched at the same time as I/O, PC World reports that the company set up shop outside the event using a large wedding tent as a prop signifying the marriage of competing operating systems.

Cute, but also telling. Why endorse App Player when Apple wants to beat Google and vice versa?

Even so, posturing doesn't change the truth that, were you to survey the audience of I/O, you'd undoubtedly find hundreds of Mac users hunting and pecking away notes about the latest Android and Chrome OS breakthroughs. I was among that group last year, and I'm still using Android, the Chrome OS, and Mac OS X on a daily basis.

My point? It really doesn't matter what Apple and Google think. BlueStacks has a killer app in the making because users like cross-platform compatibility. But don't take my word for it; look at the data. Virtualization software suppliers Citrix (NAS: CTXS) and VMware (NYS: VMW) combine for more than $6 billion in annual revenue.

Breaking bad rules
Building a bridge between incompatible systems is just one way upstarts such as BlueStacks are changing the rules of the software business. What's next? Fool co-founder David Gardner has some ideas, all of which you'll find in our Motley Fool Rule Breakers newsletter service. Want in? Check out a 30-day trial subscription. If that's not up your alley just yet, you can still check out a free special report detailing the next trillion-dollar revolution.

Also, if you want to get our most exclusive Apple analysis from our top tech analyst Eric Bleeker, be sure to check out our brand new premium Apple research report. Not only do you get his take on the company's future, but you'll also receive a full year of updates going  forward. Simply click here to claim a copy today.

The article Meet the Company That's Disrupting Apple and Google originally appeared on Fool.com.

Fool contributor Tim Beyers is a member of the Motley Fool Rule Breakers stock-picking team and the Motley Fool Supernova Odyssey I mission. He owned shares of Apple and Google at the time of publication. Check out Tim's web home, portfolio holdings, and Foolish writings, or connect with him on Google+ or Twitter, where he goes by @milehighfool. You can also get his insights delivered directly to your RSS reader.The Fool owns shares of Apple and Google. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of VMware, Apple, and Google. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended creating a bull call spread position in Apple. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. We Fools may not all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

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