Last week, the tech world giggled to itself uncontrollably when it was discovered that Apple's (NAS: AAPL) iPhone 4S and its Siri virtual assistant named another device as the "best smartphone ever."

When asked, Siri would send the query over to third-party data aggregator Wolfram Alpha, which would pull recent data on average customer reviews and spit out the almighty Nokia (NYS: NOK) Lumia 900 as the result.

anImage

Source: The Next Web.

Source: The Next Web.


Microsoft (NAS: MSFT) Windows Phone bulls enjoyed a hearty chuckle as it seemed like validation of the budding platform's viability, while the Lumia 900 has seen a warm response, especially as carrier partner AT&T is pushing it aggressively as its new exclusive flagship smartphone.

The tables subsequently turned when The Next Web asked a Lumia 800 the same question, which tapped into Mr. Softy's TellMe service and Bing search results, with the top hit being a Business Insider article titled, "Yes, The iPhone Is Still The Best Smartphone You Can Buy."

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Source: The Next Web.

Source: The Next Web.

Which do you believe? Siri or Tellme? Each smartphone was oddly telling users that the other device was the belle of the ball.

One of the benefits of using a server-based voice recognition engine is that Siri can easily be tweaked, and the assistant has now been updated with a more expected response (presumably after being reprimanded for its treachery).

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Source: Screenshot from author's iPhone.

Source: Screenshot from author's iPhone.

Of course, these anecdotal observations are little more than fun and games based on third-party information sources. For something a little more meaningful, how about we turn to some cold, hard figures from researcher NPD Group.

NPD's most recent figures on the state of the smartphone market in the first quarter show Apple as the top U.S. smartphone maker with a 29% market share, while Samsung came in a close second with 24%.

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Looking at the operating-system front, Google (NAS: GOOG) Android claimed top dog with 61%, Apple scored second with the same 29% share, and Research In Motion (NAS: RIMM) was just 5%. Windows Phone? Just 2%. Ouch.

NPD lists the top five selling handset models, with Cupertino sweeping the top three spots.

Rank

Model

Operating system

1 iPhone 4S iOS
2 iPhone 4 iOS
3 iPhone 3GS iOS
4 Samsung Galaxy S II Android
5 HTC EVO 3-D Android

Source: NPD.

In all honesty, I like Windows Phone. I think it has an innovative interface that boasts some usability advantages over iOS, coupled with a unique design style. It just seems like the broader market isn't too impressed.

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At the time this article was published Fool contributor Evan Niu owns shares of AT&T and Apple, but he holds no other position in any company mentioned. Check out his holdings and a short bio. The Motley Fool owns shares of Google, Apple, and Microsoft. Motley Fool newsletter services have recommended buying shares of Google, Microsoft, Apple, and Nokia and creating bull call spread positions in Apple and Microsoft. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy. We Fools don't all hold the same opinions, but we all believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days.

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