reasons why resumes are rejectedBy Ryan Mack, Come Recommended

Recruiters spend countless hours reviewing resumes and screening candidates. In fact, they spend so much time scanning resumes, they can often do it in one minute or less.

As disappointing as that may be given all the hard work you put into your resume, it's the unfortunate reality...and with such a small amount of time to make an impression, it's no wonder they occasionally get it wrong. You may have been the perfect person for the position, but because you failed to successfully package yourself, your resume and your chances end up meeting their demise with the click of a mouse. Read on to learn the top four reasons your resume may end up in recycle bin or folder.


1. The length

Have you ever read a magazine article, short story, blog, etc. and remember thinking "Get to the point already?" Well, recruiters have this same thought when they read over a three-page resume. Nine times out of 10 they will probably just move it to the rejection stack.

Your resume is not meant to be an exhaustive list of every job you've ever held, every award you have ever received, and every training program, club, or activity you have ever attended. To make the best impression and have the best chance of making the cut, highlight those things on your resume most important to the position at hand.

Don't be afraid to use different resumes for different positions. Taking a few extra minutes on your end to tailor your resume could mean the difference between the hiring manager or the trash being the next recipient of your application.


2. No cover letter

If you are over or under qualified for a position, have a varied work history, or have skills that aren't highlighted on your resume, a cover letter is essential. While you may know your full life story, a recruiter does not.

What may appear as a lack of commitment from having a multitude of experience may be explainable through justification, such as a trailing spouse or time off to care for your family.

Your one size fits all resume may not explain why you are interested in and qualified for a position that isn't an exact title match to your prior roles.

In addition, you may be seeking to return to a staff role from a management role due to personal reasons. It is important to professionally highlight this in your cover letter vs. leaving it to the recruiter's imagination that you can't handle the role, are facing termination, or are desperate.


3. Grammar and spelling

We've all been there at one point or another. We have reviewed a piece of writing, a proposal, or, worse yet, our resume a million times and think we have it perfect. For whatever reason, our eyes and spellchecker let us down and we miss the spelling blunder. The recruiter, however, does not. Your perceived lack of attention to detail is an instant eye catcher to the recruiter - do not pass go; do not collect $200.


4. Achievements vs. job description

One of the biggest and most frequent reasons people fail to be noticed by their resume is job details vs. results orientation. No matter how many big words you use to describe your job duties, if you fail to identify your contributions to past organizations, you may be passed over.

Companies want to know they are getting value for their buck in today's market. It isn't enough just to be qualified for a position. They are looking for employees that can hit the ground running and make contributions fast. By highlighting how you have added to the success of your past employer, you are likely to catch the recruiter's eye and make it to the top of the pile.

What are some resume blunders you have made?

Ryan Mack is a partner at TruYuu, an online service that helps people present themselves as more than just a resume to employers. You can connect with Ryan and the TruYuu team on Facebook and Twitter.

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CJ

Some employers need to focus more on racial awareness, coalition building, prejudice reduction, and diversity management. I can care less about the cover letter. As an employer, I am more interested in the future employee's work history.

November 14 2011 at 8:34 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
CJ

Some employers need to focus more on racial awareness, coalition building, prejudice reduction, and diversity management. I can care less about the cover letter. As an employer, I am more interested in the future employee's work history.



See full article from DailyFinance: http://srph.it/sBqsoH

November 14 2011 at 8:32 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
gdee241

Ryan,

Let's get it right; it's Résumé not resume. Criminny!

November 10 2011 at 11:20 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
HAPPY HUNTING

Read your resume. Do you have value? If the answer is "YES" you may hire yourself. The Founding Fathers of the USA allowed you to offer your value to everyone including yourself. Entrepreneurs built this country. But you are not an entrepreneur. You are not a salesperson, you never sold anything in your life.

WRONG! You have been selling yourself since you were a baby, naturally. The last job you had you sold your value to your boss. You stopped there and did not try to sell your value to another client unless you had a part time job that paid next to nothing.

You let your client (your boss) take your value and when the boss was done taking your value your boss discontinued your relationship. You were a "human resource”. You expected your boss to love you for the rest of your life and give you a pension and a gold watch when you retired. That does not happen anymore!

Albert Einstein said you cannot solve problems on the same level they were created. If you have the problem of reading your resume, knowing you have value and after sending resume after resume you can not create income with your value, contact me.

I am retired. After building several successful businesses, I am paying forward for the help that I have received over the years by helping others. Zig Zigler (google him) said "You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want.

You can use this principle if you use integrity and offer that help with a pleasant attitude. No one will do business with you if you cheat him or her or if you are difficult to work with. If you are allowing your boss to cheat you when the boss takes back benefits and tells you to do your work and the work of your co-worker who has been downsized you should be looking.

You should not do be cheated with a smile and rationalize at least you have a job. You are not secure, you may be downsized next. If you choose to sell your value to a boss as an employee or human resource rather than an independent contractor and you continue doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results ask yourself how that is working out for you.

Get off the "Merry Go Round" it is not merry! I do not charge for helping people move forward. Contact me at Mayoaid@aol.com.

November 09 2011 at 6:13 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
HAPPY HUNTING

Read your resume. Do you have value? If the answer is "YES" you may hire yourself. The Founding Fathers of the USA allowed you to offer your value to everyone including yourself. Entrepreneurs built this country. But you are not an entrepreneur. You are not a salesperson, you never sold anything in your life.

WRONG! You have been selling yourself since you were a baby, naturally. The last job you had you sold your value to your boss. You stopped there and did not try to sell your value to another client unless you had a part time job that paid next to nothing. You let your client (your boss) take your value and when the boss was done taking your value your boss discontinued your relationship. You were a "human resource”.

You expected your boss to love you for the rest of your life and give you a pension and a gold watch when you retired. That does not happen anymore! Albert Einstein said you cannot solve problems on the same level they were created. If you have the problem of reading your resume, knowing you have value and after sending resume after resume you can not create income with your value, contact me.

I am retired. After building several successful businesses, I am paying forward for the help that I have received over the years by helping others. Zig Zigler (google him) said "You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want. You can use this principle if you use integrity and offer that help with a pleasant attitude. No one will do business with you if you cheat him or her or if you are difficult to work with.

If you are allowing your boss to cheat you when the boss takes back benefits and tells you to do your work and the work of your co-worker who has been downsized you should be looking. You should not do be cheated with a smile and rationalize at least you have a job. You are not secure, you may be downsized next. If you choose to sell your value to a boss as an employee or human resource rather than an independent contractor and you continue doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results ask yourself how that is working out for you. Get off the "Merry Go Round" it is not merry!

I do not charge for helping people move forward. Contact me at Mayoaid@aol.com.

November 09 2011 at 6:06 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
HAPPY HUNTING

Read your resume. Do you have value? If the answer is "YES" you may hire yourself. The Founding Fathers of the USA allowed you to offer your value to everyone including yourself. Entrepreneurs built this country. But you are not an entrepreneur. You are not a salesperson, you never sold anything in your life.

WRONG! You have been selling yourself since you were a baby, naturally. The last job you had you sold your value to your boss. You stopped there and did not try to sell your value to another client unless you had a part time job that paid next to nothing. You let your client (your boss) take your value and when the boss was done taking your value your boss discontinued your relationship. You were a "human resource”.

You expected your boss to love you for the rest of your life and give you a pension and a gold watch when you retired. That does not happen anymore! Albert Einstein said you cannot solve problems on the same level they were created. If you have the problem of reading your resume, knowing you have value and after sending resume after resume you can not create income with your value, contact me.

I am retired. After building several successful businesses, I am paying forward for the help that I have received over the years by helping others. Zig Zigler (google him) said "You can have everything in life you want if you will just help enough other people get what they want. You can use this principle if you use integrity and offer that help with a pleasant attitude. No one will do business with you if you cheat him or her or if you are difficult to work with.

If you are allowing your boss to cheat you when the boss takes back benefits and tells you to do your work and the work of your co-worker who has been downsized you should be looking. You should not do be cheated with a smile and rationalize at least you have a job. You are not secure, you may be downsized next. If you choose to sell your value to a boss as an employee or human resource rather than an independent contractor and you continue doing the same thing over and over again expecting different results ask yourself how that is working out for you. Get off the "Merry Go Round" it is not merry!

I do not charge for helping people move forward. Contact me at Mayoaid@aol.com.

November 09 2011 at 6:05 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
jerzfox

I do all the "right" things and avoid all the "wrong" ones...and STILL my resume gets rejected.

November 09 2011 at 5:37 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
cinderellawithu

I recruit often. What am I looking for? LONGEVITY at your previous positions. Sorry, but if you are in and out of jobs for WHATEVER reason, there is a very good chance that I will not get tenure from you. Training can be expensife and time consuming. CONSISE information. Do not throw in a bunch of extra words or irrelevant information. In this economy, far too many applicants are asking for more money than their last position or still ask "what can this company do for me"? Tell them what you will contribute to their company. Do not focus on benefits or pay too much or it could backfire leaving the interviewer to think "Will we ever make this person happy"? Best of luck in your search! :)

November 09 2011 at 5:22 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to cinderellawithu's comment
cinderellawithu

sorry, expensive (sp) Also, cover pages are irrelevant to me as your experience and history is what is going to matter. However, I dont think any less or more of someone with one. Hopefully, my peers agree!

November 09 2011 at 5:34 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
NYC Halla

what do you consider longevity? There's various reasons why people job hop. It could be lack of growth at the company for the career path that person wants to go. Alot of jobs are like that, looks nice and all, but when you're in, you see people have been there for 20+ years and no sign of leaving, and those who do, their positions are either eliminated & the work given to the subordinate without promotion & pay increase, or the position is outsourced and/or off-shored. There is a difference in the 2 btw. I know where i'm at, the only way for me to "grow" in the company is to go into a totally different department that doesn't even do anything remotely close to what I do now. So my plan right now is to get some company-paid training classes before the end of the fiscal year, and get my bonus, then leave for a new job shortly after.

And another thing, job-hopping is only viewed as a bad thing if you're not senior management or a c-level person. I've seen more than my share of people who are Directors, or c-level and they've started & left a company within about 6 months. And it wasnt due to a lay off either.

November 10 2011 at 12:48 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to NYC Halla's comment
Barbara

Very smart analogy!!!

November 15 2011 at 11:07 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down
Brian

Being under employed and seeking a good job is tough. I want to stay in the community I currently live in. I have found there are very, very few job openings for work that pays a decent amount (righ now 35K looks like a fortune). Of the few job openings there are, only a small fraction are looking for people with the job skills I posess. Add in a few hundred applicants, and it makes for a long hard road.

November 09 2011 at 5:17 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
YourFtr

Why do Companies bother to Vett anybody for any job? Once you are hired; the very next manager down the corridor thinks he has the authority to use you for A. Cleaning the Bathrooms. B. Being a Secretary C. Typing in Data Entry. D. Doing various Chores outside of your Degree Field .

November 09 2011 at 5:15 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply