The 10 Most Expensive Hurricanes in U.S. History

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HurricanesAt times, 2011 has felt like a parade of natural disasters: Earthquakes and tornadoes and floods, oh my! But wait, there are more coming. Hurricane season has just begun.

The Atlantic hurricane season, which runs from June to November, is predicted to to be heavy, and it comes on the heels of a spring that brought the deadliest and strongest tornadoes on record in the United States. With the massive F5 that leveled a large swath of Joplin, Mo., on May 22 and took more than 135 lives, as well as the June twisters that caused a total of 322 deaths, the nation's weather-related damage for 2011 has already topped $3 billion from tornadoes alone.

Hurricanes tend to be more expensive, and in the past few years, we've been lucky to have avoided the worst storms.

The National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration predicts about 18 named tropical storms will form this year, with six to 10 of them expected to reach hurricane status. Researchers at Colorado State University offer a complimentary analysis, suggesting that 2011 will see about 16 named storms, with five developing into major hurricanes. These numbers stand menacingly higher than the average North Atlantic season of 11 named storms and two hurricanes in the upper strength categories.

Even though a Category 4 or 5 hurricane can cause serious damage, it's not always the strongest hurricanes that leave the most devastation in their wake. In fact, out of the top 10 most expensive hurricanes on record, two were Category 2 and one, Agnes in 1972, was a Category 1. Hurricane Katrina was just a Category 3, and the areas it touched are still feeling the effects of its estimated $81 billion in property damage today. It was also one of the most lethal, with 1,836 deaths caused by the storm and the floods and chaos that followed.



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Harleygent

This article is incorrect because it does not relate to adjusted dollars and actual deaths. It almost tries to do nothing but scare us and probably think that it must be that horrible global warming. This chart below at NOAA better explains things and show hurricanes are hurricanes and are and have been destructive since at least one million BC. Come on, media industrial complex, please give us good information. Then we can decisde where to live safely.
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Landsea/deadly/index.html Then goto tables 13 and 13A. It pretty much shows we been beat up by hurricanes ever since we started keeping good records.
The biggest cost today verses past is that there is more lands occupied by structures, many many more people and more and more media to lead us astray.

June 17 2011 at 3:15 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Gary Ibanez

Sit tight and be ready

June 13 2011 at 8:33 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
gposner27

And our country is being overrun with 50 million illegal aliens from mexico that steal our jobs, use up all our social services, refuse to learn english and cause overcrowding and dumbing down Americans education systems.

June 13 2011 at 3:41 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to gposner27's comment
gposner27

REPORT ANY BUSINESS THAT EMPLOYES ILLEGAL ALIENS TO YOU GOVERNOR SO THEY CAN SHUT DOWN THE BUSINESS AND DEPORT THE ILLEGAL ALIENS.

June 13 2011 at 3:42 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
rltor21c

ARE THESE PEOPLE GOD? THEY NEVER CAN PREDICT ACCURATELY, THIS IS NATURE ...WHY SCARE PEOPLE??

June 13 2011 at 3:41 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to rltor21c's comment
N68Firebird

They can predict with reasonable certainty, at least far enough ahead so people can evacuate if necessary.

June 13 2011 at 6:16 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
JamesAt17

How many of you wherever you live have looked up and seen the long streaks left behind jets? Streaks that spread out and linger for the entire day. Chemtrails/contrails, there is a debate about which one these streaks are. Some say that chemicals are being sprayed and they have the proof of it. Then there are those that totally deny that chemicals are being sprayed. What I am getting at is that these streaks left behind by jets (military) are causing the weather to be affected in those areas being sprayed, and when this is done it causes the weather to change in another area. Weather modification is real and this could be the cause of sever weather worldwide. This needs to be looked into by everyone that has been affected by one of these terrible storms. You could be someone that has a legit case against the government for knowing about this and allowing it to happen nationwide and to have affected you and your loved ones. Chemtrails - look it up and read about it. YouTube is a good place to start.

June 13 2011 at 12:27 PM Report abuse -5 rate up rate down Reply
arthurmetz

If we had exited Iraq when Katrina hit - brought our soldiers home - we would have had the resources here to take care of the horror that hit the Gulf Coast, organize and assist in the re-building. Government would have been able to say we need our people in our homeland and we would have saved billions of dollars and thousands of lives. Why can't our Congress and Senate see through the bickering and posturing and get to the point of taking care of the people. We are supposed to be the greatest nation on earth and yet our roads and bridges need repair, we have countless homeless and people in need here and we spend on everything but the people and our nations needs. It's frustrating.

June 13 2011 at 12:12 PM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to arthurmetz's comment
gposner27

and our country is being overrun with 50 million illegal aliens from mexico that steal our jobs, use up all our social services, refuse to learn english and send cause ocercrowding and umbing down Americans education systems.

June 13 2011 at 12:24 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to gposner27's comment
Justin

" Dey took'ur jerbs!"
"Dey tirrrkk errrr JERRRBBSS!"

Idiot.

June 13 2011 at 2:32 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down
N68Firebird

I don't think that would have helped. There were people on the ground who had returned to their homes, anxious to be hired to assist to help in rebuilding - but contractors showed up from Texas and other areas with illegal Mexicans, and the Louisiana natives were sent away.

June 13 2011 at 6:48 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
leonard

If our Goverment would (QUIT) sending billions overseas to country that don't like us, and start helping Americans who need it, we would not have any problems.

June 13 2011 at 11:48 AM Report abuse +6 rate up rate down Reply
3 replies to leonard's comment
Aloofah

Army corp of engineers is the real problem their laziness is what drove the cost up in Katrina.

June 13 2011 at 11:42 AM Report abuse +4 rate up rate down Reply
tigerlily5565124

New Orleans was 30 miles west of Katrina's eye. We lost our home in Gulfport, MS and I was in Biloxi when Katrina hit us. New Orleans got all the press and Mississippi was virtually ignored by the lame stream media. NO officials knew about the levees since 1977 and was given millions upon millions of dollars to shore up the levees. Where did that money go?

June 13 2011 at 10:08 AM Report abuse +15 rate up rate down Reply
3 replies to tigerlily5565124's comment
D M

First off, Katrina DID NOT HIT New Orleans... Katrina exposed New Orleans for its failures of building a proper levy system... Also, Katrina was a category 5, not 3....It spread across the entire gulf coast!!! From New Orleans, LA to Mobile, AL with the brunt falling upon Biloxi, MS. Get your facts straight and tell the story right!!!!!!!!!!

June 13 2011 at 9:50 AM Report abuse +6 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to D M's comment
swimdude1978

I believe what the person writing the article was referring to was that Katrina was a Category 5 storm when it was in the Gulf of Mexico, however, when it finally hit land the intensity of Katrina had diminished to a Category 3 storm. This information, according to the National Weather Service.

June 13 2011 at 10:46 AM Report abuse +11 rate up rate down Reply