The world's most expensive bikini costs $30 million. It's made entirely of diamonds and platinum, and came to prominence in 2006, when model Molly Sims lit up that year's Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue, beckoning from the centerfold in ribbons of shimmering jewels.


While I've never wanted to buy an eight-figure bikini, I do tend to like ones that are a bit out of my price range, which led me to wonder: How is it that two-pieces can be so expensive when they're so tiny?

Turns out, swimwear is surprisingly costly to make when compared to other garments. "The labor is the same as a shirt," explains Marshal Cohen, chief industry analyst at the NDP Group, "and there's only slightly less material -- a yard instead of two for a shirt -- so that's not enough of a difference to offset the price. It's the lack of ability to commoditize it or to use economies of scale."

That is, because swimsuits are a specialized item that people tend to buy seasonally -- as opposed to jeans, for example -- manufacturers don't produce as many. And because they make fewer bikinis, they can't take as much advantage of the cost savings that come from mass production, such as discounts for buying materials in bulk. As a result, it costs the manufacturers more to produce each suit.

Because the traditional swimwear season is so short, retailers quickly begin reducing their prices to keep consumers buying. But to afford those reductions, manufacturers have to set their original prices relatively high. "You have to mark it up to be able to mark it down," says Cohen.

The Well-Traveled Two-Piece


Another factor contributing to the price is what Cohen calls "the transit lifestyle of the product," that is, the series of stores that a suit moves through as the summer season ends. An example: Let's say a suit retails for $250 at a department store. No one buys it, even once it has been marked down. So the store sends it back to the manufacturer.
The manufacturer then turns around and resells that same suit to a discount store at a lower price. That store prices it at $100. If it still doesn't sell, that retailer may also send it back to the manufacturer.

For round three, the manufacturer sells the same suit to a jobber, "someone who buys bulk, pays 10 cents on the dollar, and sells in little shops all around the world," says Cohen. Each time the manufacturer has to deal with the returned merchandise, they not only have to resell the suit at a lower price they also have to absorb the transport costs of reshipping the merchandise around the country or even the world.

But the business model only tells half the story. The other reason a bikini can be expensive is because of what the consumer expects it to do -- fit well, flatter the body, and keep us from falling out of our tops.

'When You Find a Bathing Suit That Really Fits, That's Worth It'


Most women "have a specific need," says Jen Resnick, owner of Great Shapes, a small, boutique swimwear chain in New York and New Jersey. "We just need to work with your body. It's the same as jeans: Where should it hit you? Where should it fall to make your body look the best it possibly can?"

Resnick, whose stores sell bikinis ranging from $100 to $400, believes that it all comes down to fit.

"Coming in here to shop for bathing suits is the hardest thing and the most dreaded thing by most women ... it's that important that you put something on that fits you perfectly and that you feel good in. And it's true that the quality suits definitely give you that. It's like the perfect white T-shirt, the perfect pair of jeans, it's really something you're putting on that if it doesn't fit you like a glove, you're not going to feel like it fits you like a glove."

Bathing suit manufacturers understand that. "When you find a bathing suit that really fits, that's worth it," says Kalani Miller, one half of the sister-duo behind Mikoh Swimwear, a swimwear company that burst onto the scene last year with $200 bikinis for what she calls the "high end of the middle market." "You pay for it, you put it on, and you feel that confidence that you should feel when wearing a bathing suit."

The Top and Bottom of the Market


But is that confidence worth $200, $300, $400? Depends on the individual. For the 12-month period ending March 31, 2011, the average price for a two-piece bathing suit was $22.55, which makes sense given that a whopping 25% of the market is held by Walmart (WMT), while other discount retailers like Target (TGT), T.J. Maxx and Marshall's (TJX) account for another 20% to 30% of sales.

Those shoppers, as well as the women buying H&M's $4.99 bikini tops, have clearly decided it's not.

Resnick, though, asserts that many people change their mind once they put on a high-quality suit. "A lot of times, people come in and they will totally balk at the price ... and then they put one on and leave with three .... When fit and bodies are honestly in the mix, really, as long as people leave happy and it works, there isn't really a formula you can use for price."

I disagree. I have a plan: Wait until those beautiful, expensive bikinis go through their inevitable, significant markdowns, then grab one that suits both my wallet and my body. That way, I can have my cake and eat it too. Or maybe not, if I want the thing to fit.

Loren Berlin is a columnist at DailyFinance.com. She can be reached at loren.berlin@teamaol.com. You can follow her on Twitter @LorenBerlin, and become her fan on Facebook.



Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

How to Buy a Car

How to get the best deal and buy a car with confidence.

View Course »

Banking Services 101

Understand your bank's services, and how to get the most from them

View Course »

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum

227 Comments

Filter by:
Karunia Fischer

$200 dollars for swimwear that you can wear all year round for the next 4 or 5 years.... WORTH IT! not to mention mikoh and the better brands use Italian fabric shipped to indonesia to be manufacture in Bali. They pay for quality and good conditions for their workers. Buying swimwear from Target, H&M and all the other 10 dollar suits, are a waste of time and money as they deteriorate after a couple months and also support children working at sweatshops for nothing. Not sustainable and not economical in the long run. Dont just think short term. It is expensive, yes ridiculously expensive for a small amount of fabric, but its not unreasonable for what you get. I know first hand cause I'm from indonesia and i am in a swimsuit the entire year. I still got my the same swimsuit from 4 years ago ... take that haters

April 02 2015 at 11:16 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Sara Ann Brown

I enjoy shopping for bathing suits. I work hard all year to keep my body looking good, so that when Summer comes around I won't be embarrassed to put a bathing suit on. I don't mind spending a little extra money to buy one that shows off my body in all the right ways. Sorry, but I think all of the nasty comments are coming from women who couldn't look good in a bikini to save their life. When Spring rolls around I always save a little extra money back so that I can buy a suit that is perfect. The better the fit, the bigger the price.

June 10 2011 at 8:28 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to Sara Ann Brown's comment
danthedefecator

what a sef centered twit u are...

June 12 2011 at 12:27 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
Karunia Fischer

me too sara. dont listen to jealous ignorant twats .

April 02 2015 at 11:01 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
rcbintn

CNN, you have to do better than this. Who cares? Get on the real news. Jeez.

June 10 2011 at 7:21 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
bbakerlaw

Best place to buy a two piece is Tommy Bahama. Their tops are sized the same as bras, and bottoms sold separately, about $130 for both.

June 10 2011 at 1:52 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
Hmtl4evr

the stores suck in the girls/women because it's that time of the season , beach weather , they want to look hot on the beach , the stores suck them in and take advantage of that , tagging those bikinis with outrageous prices .
Those bikinis aren't any better then your Wamart and similar stores , maybe it's the name brand .
The thing I don't get is these high priced stores have the Ba**s to price the top and the bottom at individual prices.
The top is more then the bottom, yeah I know more material, more work, lol , what a joke. I guess mommy and Daddy don't care and give the spoiled brats what they want . It's just all rediculous . Enoy that bra and underwear for triple the price.

June 10 2011 at 12:43 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
Ol Bob

As with anything, they cost what people are willing to pay.

June 10 2011 at 12:33 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
o303ob2

I don't believe a word of that article...the bikini company is using the stupid author to justify why a peice or two of cloth is trippled or quadrupled in what it cost to make it....and you idiots buy it,

June 10 2011 at 12:24 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
mdvarick

As a Floridian, we go through suits all year long. These prices are a waste of money. Target has a nice selection for any taste. My daughter goes through 6 suits a year from visiting beaches like Daytona, New Smyrna, Cocoa and Clearwater. Plus pool action which can reek havoc on a suit.

June 10 2011 at 12:04 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to mdvarick's comment
Karunia Fischer

as an indonesian coming from bali, we are fortunate enough to have summer all year round, which also means we are in a swimsuit all year round. I know first hand the benefits of buying good quality swimwear, which will last your 4 or 5 years. No need to buy 4 or 6 a year. thats a waste of money and time and a shame that once you found the perfect fit and patterns you have to give it up. Buying from target supports child sweat shops and **** material from china. Theres nothing sustainable about that. Buying Mikoh or acacia spend lots of money for italian fabric and good work conditions for their tailoring conditions. I know this because Bali is the place where all the best quality swimwear is being produced. Having said that Target also produces in Indonesia but off the island of Bali, and I've seen it, they have horrific conditions for their workers. hope that gives you some perspective

April 02 2015 at 10:59 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Tracie

Okay...ALL I can say is THESE WOMEN ARE STUPID for spending more than $25 for an ENTIRE bikini...there isn't $200 dollars worth of material in one of those skimpy little suits.
WHERE do these women WORK to be able to spend THAT kind of money on suits for a summer. I only buy ONE bathing suit at a time...of which I do NOT own one right now. I haven't bought/worn a bathing suit in about 8 years. Don't go swimming any more since kids grew up and moved out. Besides the OBVIOUS, that I have gained a considerable amount of weight, and wouldn't be caught DEAD in a bathing suit or even shorts right now.
My opinion is, there are just SOME things that overweight people shouldn't be seen in out in public...just sayin'.

June 10 2011 at 9:54 AM Report abuse +5 rate up rate down Reply
Tracie

Okay...ALL I can say is THESE WOMEN ARE STUPID for spending more than $25 for an ENTIRE bikini...there isn't $200 dollars worth of material in one of those skimpy little suits.
WHERE do these women WORK to be able to spend THAT kind of money on suits for a summer. I only buy ONE bathing suit at a time...of which I do NOT own one right now. I haven't bought/worn a bathing suit in about 8 years. Don't go swimming any more since kids grew up and moved out. Besides the OBVIOUS, that I have gained a considerable amount of weight, and wouldn't be caught DEAD in a bathing suit or even shorts right now.
My opinion is, there are just SOME things that overweight people shouldn't be seen in out in public...just sayin'.

June 10 2011 at 9:54 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply