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Tax Day Deals

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Tax day bites from CinnabonNobody likes spending money on Tax Day. For many Americans, writing that check to Uncle Sam is painful enough.

To make it more enjoyable, many national companies offer Tax Day freebies and discounts. Following is a list of breaks to make your Tax Day just a little better:
  • If you're tired of filing as single, try your hand at online matchmaking through Chemistry.com. The site is offering three days free beginning on Tax Day.
  • You can make copies of your tax returns for free at participating Office Depot stores. There is a limit of 25 pages, enough for most taxpayers to get your 1040 form copied with room to spare.
  • If you're working through Tax Day, pick up a baker's dozen of bagels and two tubs of cream cheese for the office from Bruegger's bagels. The cost is just $10.40 with coupon (download one from their site).
  • P.F. Chang customers can get a 15% discount on dine-in and take-out meals today.
  • Maggies Moo's Ice Cream will give away three-ounce Crumb Cake Fundaes from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. for taxpayers with a sweet tooth.
  • While we don't recommend drinking your tax woes away, a tasty beverage at happy hour can be just the thing to wrap up your day. To make it easy for you, McCormick & Schmick's will give customers who order a bar drink a "Tax Relief Certificate" worth $10.40.
  • To sweeten the deal, Cinnabon is offering two, free Cinnabon Bites to customers from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • After all those goodies, you might need a work out. Fortunately, Bally Total Fitness offers free workouts today to non-members. Members win, too, since they can enjoy free personal training.
  • Top the day off with a free, 10-minute mini-massage offered by Hydromassage.
Keep in mind that many of these companies are franchises and deals, so discounts and promotions may vary from store to store. It's best to call beforehand if you have your heart set on a tax deal.br />

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