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Can I Get My Tax Refund Back Faster?

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Now that the tax filing season is in full swing -- and the IRS is processing all returns --
taxpayers are clamoring to find out how quickly they can get their refunds. Here are a few tips:

  • The IRS estimates that your refund check will be issued within six weeks from the received date for paper returns or three weeks after the acknowledgment date for an e-filed return. If you need your refund quickly, consider e-filing.
  • If you e-file and use direct deposit, you should expect to receive your refund in eight to 10 days.
  • If your refund was returned to the IRS because your mailing address was incorrect, you may be able to change the address that the IRS has on file for you by going online. Use the "Where's My Refund?" tool.
  • If you believe your check has been lost or stolen, you can file an online claim for a replacement check if it's been more than 28 days from the date that the IRS mailed your refund. Again, use the "Where's My Refund?" tool.
If you're looking for ways to check on the status of your refund, you have a few options:
  • Use the IRS online tool. If you don't want to use the mobile app, you can use the traditional online "Where's my refund?" tool from IRS.
  • Call the IRS. The IRS encourages you to use the online tool for the fastest service, but if you'd prefer to call the IRS, the number is 1-800-829-1040.
To access your refund information, you'll need your Social Security number, filing status and the amount of your refund. You can enter this information into the app or the refund tool on the IRS website, but don't supply this information in reply to email requests or on any website to which you didn't navigate (beware of tax-related scams).



You can usually get information about your refund 72 hours after IRS acknowledges receipt of your e-filed return, or in three to four weeks if you filed a paper return. "Where's my Refund?" is updated weekly, every Wednesday.


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