10 Worst Neighborhoods for Car Theft


car theftHave you ever come out of a restaurant, store or even your home, and been unable to find your car? First you wonder if your memory has failed, then you get a feeling that something isn't right. Your car is gone! Stolen.

Has this happened to you? Curious about the likelihood that it could?

In the U.S. there are about three auto thefts for every 1,000 residents, which end up costing owners and their insurance companies an estimated $5.2 billion -- or about $6,500 per stolen vehicle.

But of course, where you live and where you park -- even in the same city -- can make all the difference. For instance, in one Dallas neighborhood you have a one-in-four chance of having your vehicle stolen. NeighborhoodScout also lists nine other neighborhoods in America where you have the greatest chance of being a victim of car theft. The city of Las Vegas has the unfortunate distinction of claiming three of the top neighborhoods for car theft on NeighborhoodScout's list.
If your neighborhood is not on the list below, use this tool to see how safe it is to park near your home: Get the Car Theft Risk for Your Address.The company defines neighborhoods the same way the U.S. government does -- by census tract -- and if there isn't a generally recognized name available for an area, its neighborhood name is derived from the tract's largest street or intersection.

Top 10 U.S. Neighborhoods for Car Theft Risk

West Commerce StreetRank: 1
City: Dallas, Texas
Neighborhood: West Commerce Street
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 223.77
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 4
More on This Neighborhood


Lubertha JohnsonRank: 2
City: Las Vegas, Nev.
Neighborhood: Lubertha Johnson Park
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 164.76
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 6
More on This Neighborhood


Peralta VillaRank: 3
City: Oakland, Calif.
Neighborhood: Peralta Villa
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 137.64
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 7
More on This Neighborhood


Dolittle ParkRank: 4
City: Las Vegas, Nev.
Neighborhood: Dolittle Park
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 130.74
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 8
More on This Neighborhood


D StreetRank: 5
City: Las Vegas, Nev.
Neighborhood: D Street
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 122.29
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 8
More on This Neighborhood


First WardRank: 6
City: Charlotte, N.C.
Neighborhood: First Ward
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 103.54
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 10
More on This Neighborhood


Astor Ave.Rank: 7
City: Commerce, Calif.
Neighborhood: Astor Avenue
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 95.33
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 10
More on This Neighborhood


Cabrillo RoadRank: 8
City: San Jose, Calif.
Neighborhood: Cabrillo Road
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 95.05
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 11
More on This Neighborhood


TriangleRank: 9
City: Milwaukee, Wis.
Neighborhood: Triangle
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 94.96
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 11
More on This Neighborhood


Jordan DownsRank: 10
City: Los Angeles, Calif.
Neighborhood: Jordan Downs
Motor Vehicle Thefts Per 1,000: 92.60
Chance of Having Your Vehicle Stolen (if you live in this neighborhood one year): 1 in 11
More on This Neighborhood




...........................................

More From NeighborhoodScout.com:
· NeighborhoodScout.com
· Get the Car Theft Risk for Your Address
· Find the Safest Neighborhoods in Any City



...........................................


NeighborhoodScout's Methodology:
Exclusive Neighborhood Crime Information

Location, Inc. offers the most detailed national database of neighborhood crime statistics available today. If neighborhood crime risk - including motor vehicle theft risk - is important to you, we provide the exclusive information you need for informed decisions.

Hyper-local crime research and risk assessment in the United States is hindered by two important and pervasive issues: 1. Incomplete counts at the municipal level due to an agency-centric rather than a locality-centric method of reporting to the federal government; and 2. the lack of specific locations for crimes reported by most law enforcement agencies. We address both of these issues in the way Location, Inc. develops its database.

Most city and town crime data are incomplete and inaccurate because crimes are reported by individual law enforcement agencies, rather than by city or town, and many cities have more than one agency responsible for law enforcement (municipal, university, county, etc.). Even FBI data are reported by agency not by city or town, providing an incomplete assessment of city-wide crime counts. It is an agency-centric rather than locality-centric reporting method.

In addition, neighborhood crime research across the nation is further hindered because the majority of law enforcement agencies in the United States do not geocode the specific locations of reported crimes, making it difficult to ascertain the locations and neighborhoods of most crimes in America today.

To address both of these issues with the goal of local crime risk assessment and comparative analysis nationwide, Location, Inc. begins by collecting data from all 17,000 local law enforcement agencies in America, and uses a relational database to assign reported crimes from each agency to the city or town where the agency has law enforcement responsibility, and hence where the crimes occurred. Our method provides an accurate representation of the complete number and types of crimes that truly occur within any city or town.

With this accurate foundation, Location, Inc. then uses more than twenty proprietary computer models developed by its expert analysts to statistically estimate the number of violent crimes, property crime, and motor vehicle thefts for every neighborhood in the U.S. -- creating a national database of accurate neighborhood crime statistics and crime risk accessible by home or business address.

This allows us to do a national comparison of crime risk at the neighborhood level, and to include all locations treated equally using a consistent, rigorous approach.

The neighborhood data is based on the aggregate crime data for the municipality containing that neighborhood for the most recent year of non-preliminary (final) data available from the FBI. We use non-preliminary data in our models for reliability and accuracy and these data take an extra year to be released (2008). (Note: 2009 is still preliminary with regard to coding all law enforcement agencies to the municipalities that the agencies serve so that we can assemble complete and accurate locality-centric counts upon which we base our analysis, and 2010 just ended, so there is not even preliminary annual counts from all agencies for 2010.)

It is important to note that very recent changes in a neighborhood may not be reflected in our findings, as we use non-preliminary data in our risk models for accuracy and reliability, as stated, and these take a year to be released.

Our crime data cover every one of the 61,000 neighborhoods in America (sub zip code), and every one of the 14,464 cities, towns, villages, boroughs, and hamlets in the U.S. No piece of land in America is without detailed crime statistics.

What do we mean by a neighborhood, and did you make up these neighborhood boundaries?

Many communities define neighborhoods differently, from small areas of great similarity, to larger areas that fall under one colloquial name, but which have many different sub-neighborhoods within them, and ranging often with different lifestyle and living conditions. Many other communities do not electronically define neighborhood boundaries at all. To be consistent in our research approach across the nation, to include all municipalities regardless of whether they have defined neighborhood boundaries, and to treat all communities equally in the way neighborhoods are defined, we use the official government designation for neighborhoods - the census tract. These boundaries were sources from the U.S. Census Bureau.

What are census tracts?

Census tracts are small, relatively permanent subdivisions of a county that are defined by the U.S. Census Bureau in conjunction with local authorities all across the country to define real neighborhoods that are bounded to contain areas with homogeneous population characteristics (including economic status, lifestyle, and living conditions). Census tracts usually have approximately 4,000 persons, but can range between a few hundred persons to more than 8,000 in some cases. This is the most fine-grained area for which detailed information is made available from the government, to protect the individual privacy of each of us. Because census tracts are based on population, they vary in size depending on the density of settlement. In urban areas, they are small, and in rural areas they can cover an entire small town or even a few small towns in very rural areas.

How did we name the neighborhoods?

Since census tracts are subdivisions of a county, we did a spatial overlay of the census tracts onto city and town boundaries using a geographic information system to properly assign each census tract to its appropriate city or town. Then we named each census tract to the local colloquially recognized neighborhood name for that spot (e.g., Boston, MA (Dorchester). If there was not a name available, we named the census tract by the largest street or intersection in the census tract (e.g., Worcester, MA (Lincoln St/Plantation St).

Why didn't we just use zip codes?

Zip codes were developed by the Postal Service for the purpose of delivering mail, but were never intended by the Postal Service or anyone, for that matter, to define coherent neighborhoods. In addition, Zip Codes can have as many as 14 distinctly different census tracts contained within them. When distinct census tracts are blended together in a single Zip Code, the data reflects their average conditions and often gives a false sense of the area.

As can be seen from this Boston example, there are 12 distinct neighborhoods that are in or overlap zip code 02118.

Combining the richness of our data with this ultra-local scale provides unbeatable information to assess crime and theft risk.

Why neighborhoods and not cities?

Even the cities with the highest crime rates in America can and do have very safe neighborhoods, and thus it is less useful to generalize about an entire city. But using exclusive data developed by Location, Inc., and based on FBI data from all 17,000 local law enforcement agencies, we here report those specific neighborhoods in America's top cities that have the lowest predicted rates of crime, sometimes significantly lower than many suburban or rural neighborhoods.

This report on automobile theft uses detailed motor vehicle theft risk data built from the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports. Based on the most recent non-preliminary national data available, and predicted to the individual neighborhood level by NeighborhoodScout's exclusive crime models, we list the neighborhoods, cities, and states in American with the highest likelihood of having your automobile stolen. The rankings are based on motor vehicle theft rates per 1,000 population. Only neighborhoods with 1,000 or more permanent residents were included in the analysis, for extra care. We also removed neighborhoods that were dominated by incarcerated populations. For a city to be included in the list, it had to have at least 25,000 population.

Key Proprietary Crime Data Points at the Neighborhood-Level

· Number of Motor Vehicles Stolen in every neighborhood
· Motor Vehicle Theft Risk for every neighborhood
· Chances of having your car stolen in any neighborhood
· Number of violent crimes in each neighborhood
· Number of violent crimes per 1,000 neighborhood population
· A neighborhood resident's chance of becoming a victim of violent crime (e.g., 1 in 24)
· Number of property crimes in each neighborhood
· Number of property crimes per 1,000 neighborhood population
· A neighborhood resident's chance of becoming a victim of property crime (e.g., 1 in 9)
· Total number of crimes in each neighborhood
· Total number of crimes per 1,000 neighborhood population
· Neighborhood Crime Index (overall Crime Safety rating, nationally comparable)
· Neighborhood Violent Crime Index (Violent Crime Safety Rating, nationally comparable)
· Neighborhood Property Crime Index (Property Crime Safety Rating, nationally comparable)
· Total Crimes per Sq. Mile within each neighborhood
· Violent Crimes per Sq. Mile within each neighborhood
· Property Crimes per Sq/ Mile within each neighborhood
· Comparable city-wide and state-wide crime data and indices, to complement and compare to neighborhood-specific data

About Location Inc.

To license our data: email us: buy_data@locationinc.com or call us toll-free: 1-888-250-3200.

Location, Inc. is a research and data mining company born of university research, specializing in location analysis, demographic and school data information products, and location-based decision-making tools for businesses and consumers. The Company licenses data for a host of business to business applications. Location, Inc. is the owner of NeighborhoodScout.com, a national neighborhood data source and search engine which has served 10.2 million home buyers and businesses since its 2002 inception. The Company is based in Massachusetts.

Increase your money and finance knowledge from home

Introduction to Preferred Shares

Learn the difference between preferred and common shares.

View Course »

Basics of Diversification

Learn one of the fundamental concepts of building a portfolio.

View Course »

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum