Did you know that only about 11% of Americans get the recommended number of servings of fruits and vegetables each day? What easier way to get a quick serving than to down a glass of V8? It tastes good (at least I think it does) and it only takes about 20 seconds! Do that once a day, mix in some salad and raw carrots, a couple apples and you've met your fruit and vegetable quota. That makes you a better person than 89% of Americans.

The savvy marketing folks over at the Campbell Soup Company (CPB), which owns V8, have tapped into this daily dose with a line of "V8 Weekly Packs." "Get a Full Serving of Vegetables Every Day!" boasts the package. They're available in low sodium, classic, and spicy.

Except that there are only six cans in each of these "weekly packs."

No vegetables on the Sabbath? Or, does the every day weekly pack refer to five days of the week -- with a generous extra can thrown in?

Juli Mandel Sloves, a Campbell Soup Company spokesperson, told DailyFinance that the company actually manufactures the weekly packs in two different varieties: six-packs and eight-packs. "They're priced the same but the eight-packs are only available at Walmart and select grocery stores," she says.

Sloves says that while the company recognizes that there are actually seven days in a week (a good sign for shareholders), it isn't possible to manufacture seven-packs in such a way that they can be shipped in an easy and cost-effective manner.

Fair point.

But then why call it a weekly pack?

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footballartie

Another nonsense selling point Check the labels though Enough sodium to kill an elephant, even the lower sodium version

January 30 2011 at 5:45 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply