Recession not hurting the Tooth FairyTraditionally, show business and alcohol are thought to be immune to recessions.

It looks like we can add baby teeth to that list. A survey of 1,500 parents nationwide released by Delta Dental of Minnesota found that 86% did not allow economic gloom and doom to impact the Tooth Fairy's payouts. The Tooth Fairy is paying a bounty of $2.13 per tooth this year on average, up 13% from last year.
"This year's Tooth Fairy Poll average reflects improvements we're seeing in other areas of the economy," said Ann Johnson, director of community affairs for Delta Dental of Minnesota in a press release. "For example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average increased 23 percent during the same time period. The Tooth Fairy may be another indicator that the economy is starting to recover."

Delta Dental has established the Official Tooth Fairy Poll, which has a level of analytics on baby teeth prices that would make a Bloomberg terminal jealous. You can track prices over time, learn about tooth traditions in other countries, take a poll, compare tooth fairy prices around the world and more.

On a darker note, job losses and tight finances have more families going without dental insurance, despite evidence that stress, and the accompanying jaw clenchng and tooth grinding, are landing more people in a dentist's chair.

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