- Days left

Tax audit frequently asked questions

In 2008, about 1.4 million taxpayers were chosen for audit. This represents about 1% of the 140 million tax returns filed -- pretty good odds. Of those, about two-thirds were correspondence, or "paper" audits, and the remaining one third were field or "in person" audits. Even though the numbers of taxpayers audited are fairly low, anxiety about tax audits remains high. Below, we tackle some of the most frequently asked tax audit questions:




How are taxpayers chosen for audit? Despite the perception that you might be chosen for audit at any time, most IRS audits are not random. Usually, there is a trigger that signals to the IRS that a second look is warranted. Items that tend to be related to an audit include under reported income (when forms 1099 or W-2 don't match what you're reporting); tax deductions that appear to be too high considering your income; or inconsistencies from year to year (claiming a home interest mortgage deduction one year and not the next, for example).

Does itemizing my deductions make me more of an audit target? Yes and no. The IRS doesn't necessarily target taxpayers who itemize, but, by the nature of itemized returns, there is more room for error. You're simply more likely to make a mistake or make a claim that the IRS does not understand or feel is justified. With a standard deduction, there is little to no room for error. This should not, however, discourage you from itemizing if you have good records.

How will I be notified that I have been selected for audit? If the IRS thinks you made a minor mistake, they will send you a notice. In the notice, sometimes called a paper or correspondence audit, you'll be asked to send additional documentation to back up claims that you may have made; requests could include receipts for charitable donations or mileage logs for business travel.

If you have been chosen for a field or in person audit, the IRS will send you a notice advising that you have been selected for examination. The notice will state which years the audit will cover, and you'll be asked to call an agent to set up a time for the audit.

Should I hire an attorney to represent me at audit? It is not necessary for a tax professional or attorney to be present during an audit, but it may be advisable. If you're concerned about the potential consequences of an audit, or if you're just nervous about it generally, hiring a tax professional or attorney is a good idea. While it's usually not necessary to hire a tax professional or attorney for a minor, paper audit, it is often desirable to have one present at an in person audit.

How long will the auditor be at my home or place of business? The length of time an agent will be at your home or business depends on a number of factors, including the complexity of the issues presented and how organized you are with respect to your financial records. Plan to spend at least one full day with the agent.

After examining your records, the agent may ask you to gather additional information. If a follow-up meeting is necessary, you'll be notified. Otherwise, you'll receive a notice explaining the findings of the audit, as well as any adjustments.

What if I can't get the information within the date specified? If you can't get the requested information by the date specified, ask for more time. Reasonable requests are generally granted.

What if I don't provide the information requested? If you do not furnish the information requested in writing, the IRS may recalculate your return assess additional tax, together with an accuracy penalty. If you fail to respond to a request for an in person audit, or refuse to cooperate, the IRS could seek a court order to force you to comply (that is, however, a rare occurrence). Most likely, they'll simply assess more tax and penalty.

What are my appeal rights? You don't have to accept an audit report that you disagree with. You can appeal the report by sending a letter to the IRS within 30 days after receiving it.

If you request an appeal, you'll be assigned an appeals officer who is not part of the IRS division that performed your audit. You'll have a chance to plead your case directly with that officer.

If you fail to convince the appeals officer, you have another chance: You can file a petition in U.S. Tax Court. If the bill for any particular tax year in dispute is less than $50,000, you can file a small claim for $60; the process for filing the petition is outlined on the Court's Web site. If the amount is more than $50,000 or if the issue is particularly complicated, you may want to hire a tax attorney to assist you with filing a petition. A Tax Court case which is decided in small claims cannot be appealed. You may, however, appeal a decision held in "regular" Tax Court.

Learn about investing from the comfort of your own home.

Portfolio Basics

Take the first steps to building your portfolio.

View Course »

Investment Strategies

Learn the strategies you need to build a winning portfolio

View Course »

TurboTax Articles

5 Hidden Ways to Boost Your Tax Refund

Most of us are looking for ways to pay no more than we owe in taxes, or even boost our tax refunds. Here are five strategies that go beyond the obvious with tried-and-true ways to reduce your tax liability.

What, Me Worry? Last Minute Taxes

According to the Internal Revenue Service, 20-25% of all Americans wait until the last two weeks before the deadline to prepare their tax returns. At that late date, there are only two things you can do: File your taxes pronto, or request a tax extension.

Can't File by the Deadline? Top 3 Reasons to File a Tax Extension

The Internal Revenue Service allows taxpayers to file for a 6-month extension if they need more time to prepare their tax return. You can obtain a tax extension for any reason; the IRS grants them automatically as long as you complete the proper form on time. Check your state tax laws; some states accept IRS extensions while others require you to file a separate state extension form.

Add a Comment

*0 / 3000 Character Maximum