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Full House star Dave Coulier owes back taxes

Who could have imagined that a Bullwinkle imitating, television sidekick could ever get in a jam with the IRS?

Apparently, Full House's Joey (Dave Coulier) has done exactly that. Perez Hilton reported today that tax liens totaling nearly $50,000 have been filed against that TV uncle with a talent for cartoon character voices.

According to Detroit News: "The state of California filed an $11,793 lien against him on May 4 in the Los Angeles County Recorder of Deeds office.The IRS filed a $37,063 lien against him on March 17, 2008, in Los Angeles County.

Checking up on Dave Coulier's Official website, I found no mention of his little tiff with the taxing authorities. He does however, indicate that he'll be visiting close to my home in Wisconsin next month. I also checked Dave's Twitter feed to see if he tweeted about the situation. He hasn't yet mentioned his back taxes on Twitter, but he does indicate that becoming a senator may be one way to pick your nose in peace - or not.

This much I can tell you for certain; It's better to pay our taxes when they are due, than it is to try retrospectively prying the IRS off our backs. I always suggest leaving tax form preparation to a professional tax accountant, because being able to talk in comical voices won't make a tax audit one bit funnier.
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